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Alberta ultramarathoner Dave Proctor plots another cross-Canada speed record

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 18:30
CALGARY - Ultramarathoner Dave Proctor is planning another assault on the cross-Canada speed record. The 38-year-old from Okotoks, Alta., attempted to run across the country in record time in 2018. Proctor stopped after completing a third of his journey because of a back injury. Proctor’s goal is to cover the 7,200 kilometres from one Canadian coast to the other faster than Al Howie, who did it in 72 days 10 hours in 1991. Proctor’s target is 67 days starting May 18, 2020, in Newfoundland. He must average just over 100 kilometres daily to achieve it. He started in Victoria on June 27, 2018 on his first try. Proctor made it 2,415 km before a herniated disc in his back and other health issues stemming from that injury forced him to stop just east of Winnipeg. “I’m ready to take this on and I’ve got so much more in the tank this time,” Proctor said Saturday in a statement. “I wake up dreaming of the shoulder of the highway and I go to bed thinking of the open road. “The TransCanadian run is now in my blood and the only means of redemption, is to conquer it.” Proctor raised $311,000 for the Rare Disease Foundation on his initial attempt and wants to reach $1 million. His son Sam has a rare disease which impacts his balance, co-ordination and dexterity. A previous winner of Calgary and Lethbridge ultramarathons, Proctor is the Canadian record-holder in the 24-hour road race covering a distance of 257.093 km. His 153.8 kilometres in 12 hours on a stationary treadmill in May beat the previous best of 147.3 kilometres by Australian Matthew Eckford, according to Guinness World Records. The Canadian Press

Model Naomi Campbell takes spotlight at London Fashion Week

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 18:18
LONDON - Model Naomi Campbell took centre stage at London Fashion Week on Saturday night with a gala charity benefit at the impressive setting of the world famous British Museum. The gala capped a warm day filled with shows and presentations, including runway offerings by Alexa Chung and House of Holland and millinery by master hatter Stephen Jones. Big names are still coming up, with shows scheduled by Burberry, Victoria Beckham, Christopher Kane and Julien Macdonald as Fashion Week reaches its glittery climax. ___ NAOMI CAMPBELL’S ‘FASHION FOR RELIEF’ The Naomi Campbell hosted event was the latest “Fashion for Relief” fundraiser organized by the well-known model, whose efforts are supported by a wide array of friends and designers. The first charity show was in 2005 in support of victims of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. At the event, the British Museum’s steps and foyer became a red carpet staging area for fashionable elite who passed the time drinking chilled champagne and margaritas while last minute checks were made on the models’ makeup and outfits. Campbell said this year’s benefit was to raise funds to protect vulnerable children throughout the world and help provide education and skills development. The black-tie event drew a huge and enthusiastic crowd, including many who stayed for a private dinner after the runway performance. Actor Pierce Brosnan and actress Naomie Harris were among the star contingent, and the show was supported by a wide array of global fashion houses including Gucci, McQueen, Marc Jacobs and Vivienne Westwood. As an eclectic, gender-bending and fun night got underway, no single theme emerged. But the overall impact was impressive. Some of the outfits were clearly meant to be over the top, including mens’ looks that seemed to bare all: Many outfits did not cover the chest (putting a premium on gym work), and most of the tops were sheer. Double-breasted suits were meant to be worn without shirts and costumes paired white vinyl shorts with clear tops. Women were given more variety, including floral jumpsuits, beautiful black, tight-fitting dresses, one dramatic black pantsuit with puffy pink sleeves and shoulders, and “Conehead” style veils. There were also spiky overcoats, sexy kimono outfits, Russian-styled Rasputin outfits for men, and glittery silver elbow-length gloves. Overall it was punky, with plenty of attitude and edge. ___ ALEXA CHUNG SHOW ATTRACTS ADORING FANS An early start couldn’t deter Alexa Chung’s legions of loyal fans, who flocked to a Saturday morning show which included outfits that offered variations on her classic feminine themes. Chung greeted fans with a video message featuring a montage of what she described as “AC World.” She described the new styles as “clothes to feel empowered in” with a theme of “female solidarity” and said they were designed to “get over heartbreak.” The TV personality also offered a pep talk to her mostly youthful audience. “Enjoy life, kids,” she said. “It’s great.” The collection featured a number of longer coats, including belted variations. Some were worn over slip dresses or beautifully constructed longer dresses. The colours were muted, with many variations of green and gray, and Chung paid homage to the American west with a denim dress that seemed to conjure up open skies and endless vistas. There was a well-tailored double-breasted suit and some 60s-style jumpsuits, but no sign of Dynasty-style shoulder pads or power-dressing. Chung doesn’t do flash, but she couldn’t resist a few faux-snakeskin pieces. Models wore mostly light makeup and flowing hairstyles to allow for a style that looked simple, easy and elegant rather than fussy or overdone. Gregory Katz, The Associated Press

Tre Roberson, Stampeders edge Tiger-Cats 19-18 for third win in a row

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 18:15
CALGARY - A little bit of insight from Mark Killam helped Tre Roberson make a clutch play for the Calgary Stampeders on Saturday afternoon. Roberson blocked a 42-yard field goal attempt by Lirim Hajrullahu with 32 seconds left in the game to preserve a 19-18 win for the Stampeders over the Hamilton Tiger-Cats in front of 27,962 fans at McMahon Stadium. "We know that he hits a low ball," said Roberson of Hajrullahu, who kicked three field goals and a single earlier in the game. "Killer called a great call and I'm just happy to make the play." While Roberson deflected much of the praise to his special teams coach and the defensive line, Calgary head coach Dave Dickenson was quick to commend his star cornerback, who also had an interception and five tackles. "Let's be honest, it was above and beyond," Dickenson said in regards to Roberson's stand-out performance. "He's my guy that does everything right. He shows up first. He does a lot of the extra film work. He works in the community and then to go out there and perform like he did, I was proud of him. He's very smart. That elevation and the plays that he made showed you that he's special." Eric Rogers caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell for the Stampeders (8-4), who won their third straight game. "I just leaned on him a little bit," Mitchell said of Rogers, who caught eight passes for 129 yards. "He had to make some big catches and he took some big hits for me tonight, too. That's something that's always underrated that he just does. It's huge to have those guys on my side." Rene Paredes finished with four field goals for the Stamps, who will travel to Toronto to face the Argonauts on Friday. Brandon Banks caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Dane Evans for the Tiger-Cats (9-3), whose winning streak ended at four games. "I felt like we played well," said Hamilton coach Orlando Steinauer. "Playing well isn't the goal. The goal is to win. We just didn't execute as we needed to down the stretch." The Ticats built up a 17-6 lead through two quarters of play before scoring just one point on an 80-yard kickoff single by Hajrullahu to start the second half. "We just came out and laid an egg," said Evans, who completed 34-of-43 passes for 360 yards. "It was pretty much just the opposite of the first half and every man has just got to look ourselves in the mirror and figure out why we were a little flat. We'll learn and grow from this." The Stampeders trailed heading into the fourth, but Mitchell proceeded to engineer an eight-play, 89-yard drive that he capped off by tossing a 15-yard touchdown pass to Rogers in the end zone. Following the convert by Paredes, the Stamps took their first lead of the game and held on for the victory. Following a slow start for both teams, Hajrullahu opened the scoring for Hamilton with a 25-yard field goal 6:51 into the game. After Hajrullahu kicked a 22-yard field goal, Paredes responded with one of his own from 36 yards out before the end of the opening quarter. Banks caught a short pass from Evans and ran the rest of the way for a 30-yard touchdown to cap off a nine-play, 75-yard drive three minutes into the second quarter. Anthony Coombs then ran three yards into the end zone for a two-point convert to give the Ticats a 14-3 lead. Hamilton's next drive ended when Roberson picked off an errant pass by Evans at Calgary's seven-yard line to end the threat. Nine plays later, after the Stamps drove the ball 61 yards down the field, Paredes kicked a 49-yard field goal with 36 seconds remaining in the first half. After a 31-yard kickoff return by Frankie Williams, Evans drove the Ticats into Calgary territory and Hajrullahu booted a 45-yard field goal with no time left in the clock to extend Hamilton’s lead to 17-6. Following Hajrullahu's single to start the second half, Paredes booted a 17-yard field goal at 4:32 of the third quarter. On the ensuing drive for Hamilton, defensive back Raheem Wilson stripped the ball from Banks and Brandon Smith picked up the fumble to give Calgary the ball back. Once again, Calgary's drive stalled in the red zone and the Stamps had to settle for a 20-yard field goal by Paredes. Calgary's defence came up big once again a short time later as Cordarro Law sacked Evans and jarred the ball loose at midfield, allowing Mike Rose to recover the fumble. "In the first half, we was getting routed," Roberson said. "As a defence, we don't like that, especially not on our field. Everyone got together and we started making the corrections that we needed. We just went out there and we played together."   Laurence Heinen, The Canadian Press

Differences wide in UAW talks with GM, strike more likely

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:39
DETROIT - A top United Auto Workers official said the union and General Motors are far apart on major issues, increasing the likelihood of a strike as early as Sunday night. The union, in letters to members and GM Saturday, said it will let its four-year contract with the company expire just before midnight. But workers are to report to their jobs if they’re scheduled to work on Sunday. Just what the union will do after that will be decided in meetings scheduled for Sunday morning in Detroit. “If they’re not extending the agreement, then that would leave them open to strike,” said Kristin Dziczek, vice-president of the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think-tank . “They can strike once the contract has expired.” The letters are designed to turn up the pressure on GM negotiators as the contract expiration deadline approaches at 11:59 p.m. Saturday. “While we are fighting for better wages, affordable quality health care, and job security, GM refuses to put hard working Americans ahead of their record profits of $35 billion in North America over the last three years,” union vice-president Terry Dittes said in a statement. “We are united in our efforts to get an agreement our members and their families deserve.” But GM, in a statement Saturday night, still held out hope for an agreement, saying it continues to work on solutions to difficult challenges. “We are prepared to negotiate around the clock because there are thousands of GM families and their communities – and many thousands more at our dealerships and suppliers – counting on us for their livelihood. Our goal remains on building a strong future for our employees and our business,” the GM statement said. Dittes, the union’s chief bargainer with GM, wrote in the letter to local union leaders that both sides are far apart on nearly all important economic issues after months of bargaining. “We still have many outstanding issues remaining, including significant differences between the parties on wages, health care benefits, temporary employees, job security and profit sharing,” the letter said. The move by the union also comes as it faces an internal struggle over a federal corruption investigation that has touched its leader, President Gary Jones. Plant-level union leaders from all over the country will be in Detroit on Sunday to talk about the next steps, and after that, the union likely will make an announcement. But leaders surely will face questions about an expanding federal corruption probe that snared a top official on Thursday. Vance Pearson, head of a regional office based near St. Louis, was charged with corruption in an alleged scheme to embezzle union money and spend cash on premium booze, golf clubs, cigars and swanky stays in California. It’s the same region that UAW President Gary Jones led before taking the union’s top office last year. Jones has not been charged. Tom Krisher, The Associated Press

Deck collapses in Jersey Shore town, causing injuries

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:37
WILDWOOD, N.J. - Fire officials say multiple people have been injured in a deck collapse at a home on the Jersey Shore. Authorities told television station WPVI that the collapse happened around 6 p.m. in Wildwood. Emergency crews are on the scene. The Associated Press

Two students dead, several seriously injured in Vancouver Island bus rollover

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:28
Two University of Victoria students died and more than a dozen other people were injured after a bus on its way to a marine research centre rolled over on a narrow gravel road on Vancouver Island. The incident happened between the communities of Port Alberni and Bamfield, said the Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Victoria, which received a call for assistance at around 10 p.m. “It’s pretty austere out there. Lots of trees, lots of hills, lots of rugged terrain, and the weather wasn’t really co-operating,” said navy Lt. Tony Wright, a public relations officer with JRCC. The pilots couldn’t land the helicopters at the scene so ambulances took the injured to an airport in Port Alberni, he said. From there, three people were airlifted to hospital. Two of them were in critical condition and one was in serious condition, said Andrea Visscher, a spokeswoman for British Columbia Emergency Health Services. Fourteen others in stable condition were taken by ground transportation to local hospitals, she said. BC EHS couldn’t provide an update on any of the injured people’s conditions. “Once they’re admitted into hospital, we don’t get any further updates from them,” Visscher said. A school bus drove 29 others away from the scene, she said. The RCMP is investigating the cause of the crash. The Wilson’s Group, which owns Wilson’s Transportation Ltd., said in a statement that one of its buses was involved in the accident. “Our immediate concern is with the passengers, the driver and their families,” read the statement. “Management and ownership is working with authorities and the University of Victoria to address those immediate concerns.” The company added that “details are unclear at this point” and declined to answer further questions, saying it would release another statement once “confirmed details have been released.” Wilson’s Transportation is a charter bus company that serves Victoria and Vancouver Island, according to its website, and has been operating since 1962. It operates over 140 vehicles. A statement from the university said the students on the bus were headed to the Bamfield Marine Science Centre. “Our heartfelt thoughts go out to the students’ families and loved ones, to whom we offer our sincerest condolences,” said Jamie Cassels, the university’s president. The research centre also acts as a shared campus of several post-secondary institutions, according to its website. An employee who answered the phone Saturday declined to comment on the centre’s programs or why the students were travelling there, but according to its website it offers summer field courses, as well as a five-course fall semester program in marine sciences. Robert Dennis, chief councillor for the Huu-ay-aht First Nations, was driving home with his wife when they passed by the scene “There were some people laying on the ground, laying on what appeared to be blankets and were being looked after by the rest of the students,” he said. “They were definitely panicked.” The bus was overturned and about six to nine metres down an embankment, he said, adding that it rested against some trees, which seemed to have stopped it from rolling further down. People were helping remove others from the bus and getting them up to the roadway, Dennis said, adding that he and his wife provided them with water and a rain poncho for warmth. He said he and his wife stayed at the scene to help in any way they could. The JRCC said it sent two Cormorant helicopters and one Buffalo search and rescue aircraft from 442 Squadron in Comox to help with the rescue effort. Dennis said the area has no cellphone reception and he estimates he was at the scene for about two hours until first responders showed up. He said the incident occurred on a “dangerous” narrow stretch of the road, noting that the First Nations community has been asking the provincial government for the road quality to be improved for years. They would like to see it chipsealed, which he says would be a better pavement surface. The road is more than 80 kilometres long and mostly gravel, said Port Alberni Mayor Sharie Minions. It was once mostly heavily used by logging companies, she said, but now it’s also frequented by tourists and people living in coastal communities. “It’s a challenging road at the best of times. It’s narrow and (winding),” she said, adding its condition is not up to standard. “It’s a concern for sure.” The city has supported the First Nations community’s call for improvements, she said, reaching out to the provincial government as well. She’d like to see it paved or chipsealed, receive regular maintenance and increased lighting, and offer cellphone service for at least emergency calls. “The road has significant issues and there’s a lot of work that needs to be done,” she said. The research centre’s website warns travellers to drive slow on the “logging road,” which it says can be rough, but is usually well maintained. It also states that there is no cellphone service between Port Alberni and Bamfield. Dennis said his thoughts are with the families of those killed, as well as the people injured, and he hopes the incident will lead to increased safety measures on the road. Minions echoed that sentiment. “I’m incredibly saddened that it had to come to this,” she said, “but at the end of the day, we don’t want to see it happen again.” Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press

Intelligence official charged seemed to be ‘exemplar of discretion’: former colleague

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:25
An RCMP intelligence official charged with breaching Canada’s secrets law seemed to be an “exemplar of discretion,” a professor who once worked with him said Saturday. Paul Evans, a political science professor at the University of British Columbia, said he had trouble reconciling the charges against Cameron Ortis with the man he worked with years ago. Ortis, 47, was charged under three sections of the Security of Information Act as well as two Criminal Code provisions, including breach of trust, for allegedly trying to disclose classified information to a foreign entity or terrorist group. An insider familiar with the case who was not authorized to speak about it publicly has said Ortis had served in a civilian position as director general of an RCMP intelligence unit. Evans said he served on Ortis’s doctoral dissertation committee and worked with him on several projects. They continued to see each other socially from time to time after Ortis took his job with the RCMP in Ottawa, Evans said. “He did not discuss the details of his work and throughout was an exemplar of discretion and integrity in our interactions,” Evans said in a written statement. “Nothing in my experience with Cameron would lead me to suspect he would be any way involved in activities that would lead to such charges.” Ortis had been a political science graduate student starting in 1999, finishing his PhD at UBC in 2006, Evans said. The pair worked together on training programs for junior researchers from policy institutes in Asia, which included two essays they published together. Evans said the essays, published in 2002 and 2003, were about ways “the internet was being used for positive and negative purposes in the region.”  In one of those papers, Ortis and Evans wrote that readers should try to fight the urge to categorize the internet as purely good or purely bad. “In an era of Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings, and the reverberating rhetoric of the ‘Axis of Evil,’ it is difficult to resist looking at the world in terms of good and evil, the light side and the dark side,” they wrote in the 2003 paper. “Grey might be the colour of the mind, but black and white is the imagery of the moment.” The paper published in The Pacific Review goes on to examine the ways the internet was being used by bad actors at the turn of the millennium, while acknowledging that it is also sometimes a force for good. “While social scientists still need to pay attention to the positive uses and effects of the internet and variations in diffusion patterns, it is equally important to understand the darker side of the picture,” they wrote.  Evans said the paper gives “a good sense of (Ortis’s) skill set and inquiring mind.” Another UBC colleague, political science professor Brian Job, has also said he was surprised by news of Ortis’s arrest. “Nothing in my experience with Cameron would lead me to suspect his alleged involvement in the activities for which he charged,” Job said on Friday. “Indeed, the exact opposite is true.” Nicole Thompson, The Canadian Press

Officiating, scheduling won’t ever be perfect: MLS commissioner

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:11
VANCOUVER - After two decades at the helm of Major League Soccer, commissioner Don Garber knows there’s one subject everyone who loves the sport loves to complain about - officiating. He’s never had a conversation with a fan, coach, general manager, owner or player that didn’t turn to reffing at some point. “I think it’s the imperfect nature of officiating in our sport and the fact that it does require and involve judgment. And that’s what makes the game what it is today and I don’t think that’s going to change,” Garber told The Canadian Press in a wide-ranging interview. Recently, however, MLS - and soccer leagues across the globe - have introduced technology designed to help officials, including the video-assisted referee system. While some players and coaches have expressed concerns with how the system is used, Garber said VAR is correcting calls in “many, many instances.” “I don’t accept in any way that there is any team that is prejudiced or that any referee has an axe to grind. Sometimes referees have good games, sometimes they have bad games, but there’s never anything more than that,” he said. “It’s an imperfect process.” In 20 years as MLS commissioner, Garber’s heard complaints on a variety of other issues, too. He knows that players get frustrated when they have to chose between playing for their national team or their MLS club. He knows that the league’s schedule is difficult, especially this season with a re-jigged playoff schedule compressing the regular season and forcing teams to compete on separate coasts within the same week. He knows that some clubs have to travel more than others and that their trips sometimes include cancelled flights that wreak havoc on a team’s ability to train or recover. There’s no perfect answer for fixing the league’s schedule, Garber said, but a number of options are evaluated at the end of every season, including changes to conference structure or increasing how many charter flights each club can use each season. This year, players have become increasingly vocal about their concerns. Some have taken to Twitter to document hours spent in airports after a cancelled flight. Others have spoken out about officiating or contracts in the media. The athletes have also used their platform to speak out on various political or social issues, including gun violence. Many of the players’ concerns are expected to come up in talks about a new collective bargaining agreement. The current agreement expires at the end of January 2020. The MLS has never had a strike or lockout, and Garber remains optimistic about a new deal. “CBA negotiations are always difficult,” he said. “I’ve got faith in our ownership, I’ve got faith in the (MLS Players Association). We’ll go get very serious about this very quickly and I’m hopeful that we’ll be able to reach an agreement with our players.” The challenges continue to grow as MLS expands. When play began back in 1996, the league included just 10 teams. That number has ballooned to 24 this season, and will continue to grow with Miami, Austin, Nashville and St. Louis all set to add clubs by 2022. Garber said there’s no set number of teams he’d like to see in MLS, but there haven’t been any talks about creating a relegation system. The commissioner sees the league as being pretty balanced, competition wise, with 10 different clubs winning the MLS Cup over the past 12 years. And that’s the way he wants it to stay. “Like all leagues, you want to give fans at the beginning of the year the hope and dream that their team can win a championship and be very competitive,” he said. “And we’re very focused on trying to confirm that league wide.” Garber also wants to ensure that MLS clubs continue becoming more “deeply ingrained” in communities across the U.S. and Canada. Over his 20 years as commissioner, he’s watched soccer grow in popularity and, with North America hosting the World Cup in 2026, that growth is expected to continue. In the coming years, MLS is going to develop more homegrown talent and more players are going to spend “the most important years of their careers” in the league, Garber said. He also expects more state-of-the-art soccer facilities will be built and the league’s reputation to continue flourishing in the global soccer community. “It almost seems like your head can spin with the amount of activity that’s gone on this year. But I still think our best years are ahead as we onboard these new teams and continue to open up facilities,” Garber said. “The future, I think, is even brighter than some of the great successes we’ve had over the last couple of years.” Gemma Karstens-Smith, The Canadian Press

Canadian James Paxton extends personal win streak, Yankees beat Jays 13-3

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 17:07
TORONTO - Veteran outfielder Brett Gardner knocked in five runs with two homers and a double to help Canadian lefty James Paxton win his ninth start in a row as the New York Yankees blew out the Toronto Blue Jays 13-3 on Saturday. Gardner reached base six times in the Yankees’ 19-hit attack against the Blue Jays (58-91). He followed up a solo blast in the fourth inning with a three-run shot in the fifth inning. His second homer, his 25th of the season, propelled New York (98-52) to a 6-0 advantage. The centre fielder also doubled home Luke Voit in the second inning and reached base for a fourth time on a Vladimir Guerrero Jr. error. After Gio Ursula singled in the eighth inning, Gardner drove a hard smash at Blue Jays reliever Jordan Romano. The Toronto pitcher knocked the ball down and recovered in time to throw out Urshela at second. But with Gardner standing on first Romano left the game after rolling his right ankle to make the play. Gardner also made a sharp catch in left-centre in the fifth inning, banging into the wall to take a hit away from Blue Jays catcher Danny Jansen. Paxton (14-6) exited after 102 pitches and three hits in five innings. He was solid through four innings, allowing only a one-out double to left field from Toronto’s Lourdes Gurriel Jr. in the first inning. But the Yankees starter ran up his pitch count in a troublesome fifth inning. Paxton yielded an infield hit to Brandon Drury, who advanced to second base after a throwing error from shortstop Gleyber Torres. Drury then reached third on Jansen’s hit that Gardner snagged, and scored on Bo Bichette’s sacrifice fly to right field. Gurriel, in the designated-hitter role, returned to the lineup after a 30-game absence because of a left quad strain he suffered on Aug. 8. He also checked in with a single in the eighth inning. With Paxton out of the game, the Yankees put their foot to the floor in the sixth inning with three more home runs. Torres clubbed his 37th with D.J. LeMahieu aboard and Voit crushed a homer to the third deck in straightaway centre field at Rogers Centre. All three homers came off Blue Jays reliever Brock Stewart. Toronto starter Jacob Waguespack (4-5) left after 3 2/3 innings. He surrendered seven hits and three runs but managed four strikeouts. Yankees pinch-hitter Mike Ford added two-run homer in a four-run ninth inning, while Toronto shortstop Richard Urena knocked in two runs with a one-out double in the bottom half of the final frame. Notes: Toronto manager Charlie Montoyo confirmed southpaw reliever Tim Mayza tore the ulnar collateral ligament in his left elbow after a pitch in the 10th inning on Friday. Mayza, 27, will undergo Tommy John surgery and is expected to miss most of next season ... Blue Jays third-string catcher Luke Maile (oblique) was activated before the game. Tim Wharnsby, The Canadian Press

UAW to let GM contract lapse, raising likelihood of strike

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:58
DETROIT - The United Auto Workers union is letting its contract with General Motors expirejust before midnight Saturday, increasing the likelihood of a strike as early asSunday night. Citing significant differences with the company on wages, health care and other issues, union Vice-President Terry Dittes (DIT-ez) told local union officials in a letter that a decision on whether to strike will be made Sunday. The union says in a letter to GM that union members will report for regular shifts on Sunday. Both letters were obtained Saturday by The Associated Press. Dittes said in the letter to union officials that they’ll be working until the deadline in an effort to reach an agreement. But he says they’re also far apart on many issues. “We still have many outstanding issues remaining, including significant differences between the parties on wages, health care benefits, temporary employees, job security and profit sharing,” wrote Dittes, the union’s Leader in the GM negotiations. No decision on a strike will be made until after the union executive board meets and local presidents meet on Sunday morning, the letter said. Earlier this week the union announced that GM would be its target company. That means it will be the focus of bargaining a deal that will be a template for Ford and Fiat Chrysler. The union extended the contracts with Ford and Fiat Chrysler indefinitely while bargaining with GM continues. The Associated Press

Tre Roberson, Stampeders edge Tiger-Cats 19-18 for third win in a row

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:58
CALGARY - Tre Roberson blocked a 42-yard field goal attempt by Lirim Hajrullahu with 32 seconds left in the game to preserve a 19-18 win for the Calgary Stampeders over the Hamilton Tiger-Cats on Saturday afternoon. Eric Rogers caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell for the Stampeders (8-4), who won their third straight game. Roberson also had an interception, while Rene Paredes finished with four field goals. Brandon Banks caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Dane Evans for the Tiger-Cats (9-3), whose winning streak ended at four games. Hajrullahu kicked three field goals and a single before being denied by Roberson in the game’s final minute. The Stampeders trailed 18-12 heading into the fourth, but Mitchell proceeded to engineer an eight-play, 89-yard drive that he capped off by tossing a 15-yard touchdown pass to Rogers in the end zone. Following the convert by Paredes, the Stamps took a 19-18 lead - their first of the game. Following a slow start for both teams, Hajrullahu opened the scoring for Hamilton with a 25-yard field goal 6:51 into the first quarter. After Hajrullahu kicked a 22-yard field goal, Paredes responded with one of his own from 36 yards out before the end of the opening quarter. Banks then caught a short pass from Evans and ran the rest of the way for a 30-yard touchdown to cap off a nine-play, 75-yard drive three minutes into the second quarter. Anthony Coombs then ran three yards into the end zone for a two-point convert to give the Ticats a 14-3 lead. Hamilton’s next drive ended when Roberson picked off an errant pass by Evans at Calgary’s seven-yard line to end the threat. Nine plays later, after the Stamps drove the ball 61 yards down the field, Paredes kicked a 49-yard field goal with 36 seconds remaining in the first half. After a 31-yard kickoff return by Frankie Williams, Evans drove the Ticats into Calgary territory and Hajrullahu booted a 45-yard field goal with no time left in the clock to extend Hamilton’s lead to 17-6. Following an 80-yard kickoff single by Hajrullahu to start the second half, Paredes booted a 17-yard field goal at 4:32 of the third quarter. On the ensuing drive for Hamilton, defensive back Raheem Wilson stripped the ball from Banks and Brandon Smith picked up the fumble to give Calgary the ball back. Once again, Calgary’s drive stalled in the red zone and the Stamps had to settle for a 20-yard field goal by Paredes. Calgary’s defence came up big once again a short time later as Cordarro Law sacked Evans and jarred the ball loose at midfield, allowing Mike Rose to recover the fumble. Both Paredes and Hajrullahu then missed field-goal attempts wide to the right to keep the score at 18-12 for Hamilton.   Laurence Heinen, The Canadian Press

Saudi Arabia: Drone attacks knocked out half its oil supply

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:51
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Yemen’s Houthi rebels launched drone attacks on the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia and a major oil field Saturday, sparking huge fires and halting about half of the supplies from the world’s largest exporter of oil. The attacks were the latest of many droneassaults on the kingdom’s oil infrastructure assaults in recent weeks, but easily the most damaging. They raise concerns about the global oil supply and likely will further increase tensions across the Persian Gulf amid an escalating crisis between the U.S. and Iran over its unraveling nuclear deal with world powers. The attacks resulted in “the temporary suspension of production operations” at the Abqaiq oil processing facility and the Khurais oil field, Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said in a statement carried by the state-run Saudi Press Agency. The fires “were controlled,” the statement said, and no workers were injured. The fires led to the interruption of an estimated 5.7 million barrels in crude supplies, according to the statement, which said part of that would be offset with stockpiles. The statement said Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil giant, would provide updated information in the next 48 hours. The Iranian-backed Houthis, who hold Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, and other territory in the Arab world’s poorest country, took responsibility for the attacks in the war against a Saudi-led coalition that has fought since 2015 to reinstate the internationally recognized Yemeni government. But the U.S. blamed Iran, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeting, “There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.” “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply,” Pompeo added. In a short address aired by the Houthi’s Al-Masirah satellite news channel, military spokesman Yahia Sarie said the rebels launched 10 drones after receiving “intelligence” support from those inside the kingdom. He warned that attacks by the rebels would only get worse if the war continues. “The only option for the Saudi government is to stop attacking us,” Sarie said. Houthi rebels have been using drones in combat since the start of the Saudi-led war. The first appeared to be off-the-shelf, hobby-kit-style drones. Later, versions nearly identical to Iranian models turned up. Iran denies supplying the Houthis with weapons, although the U.N., the West and Gulf Arab nations say Tehran does. U.N. investigators said the Houthis’ new UAV-X drone likely has a range of up to 1,500 kilometres (930 miles). That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in range. First word of Saturday’s assault came in online videos of giant fires at the Abqaiq facility, some 330 kilometres (205 miles) northeast of the Saudi capital, Riyadh. Machine-gun fire could be heard in several clips alongside the day’s first Muslim call to prayers, suggesting security forces tried to bring down the drones just before dawn. In daylight, Saudi state television aired a segment with its local correspondent near a police checkpoint, a thick plume of smoke visible behind him. President Donald Trump called Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to offer his support for the kingdom’s defence, the White House said. The crown prince assured Trump that Saudi Arabia is “willing and able to confront and deal with this terrorist aggression,” according to a news release from the Saudi Embassy in Washington. Saudi Aramco describes its Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq as “the largest crude oil stabilization plant in the world.” The facility processes sour crude oil into sweet crude, then transports it onto transshipment points on the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea or to refineries for local production. Estimates suggest it can process up to 7 million barrels of crude oil a day. By comparison, Saudi Arabia produced 9.65 million barrels of crude oil a day in July. “This is one of the biggest central processing facilities in the world. The Iran conflict is going to be hitting the world in a new way,” said Kevin Book, managing director, research at ClearView Energy Partners LLC. The Khurais oil field is believed to produce over 1 million barrels of crude oil a day. It has estimated reserves of over 20 billion barrels of oil, according to Aramco. There was no immediate impact on global oil prices as markets were closed for the weekend. Benchmark Brent crude had been trading at just above $60 a barrel. While Saudi Arabia has taken steps to protect itself and its oil infrastructure, analysts had warned that Abqaiq remained vulnerable. The Rapidan Energy Group, a Washington-based advisory group, warned in May that “a successful attack could lead to a monthslong disruption of most Saudi production and nearly all spare production.” It called Abqaiq, close to the eastern Saudi city of Dammam, “the most important oil facility in the world.” In a report published Saturday, Helima Croft, global head of commodity strategy at RBC Capital Markets, noted that although Aramco officials have indicated that exports will resume in the next few days, “there is nothing to suggest that this is a one-off event and that the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels will forgo further strikes on Saudi sites.” The war has become the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. The violence has pushed Yemen to the brink of famine and killed more than 90,000 people since 2015, according to the U.S.-based Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project, or ACLED, which tracks the conflict. The rebels have flown drones into the radar arrays of Saudi Arabia’s Patriot missile batteries, according to Conflict Armament Research, disabling them and allowing the Houthis to fire ballistic missiles into the kingdom unchallenged. The Houthis launched drone attacks targeting Saudi Arabia’s crucial East-West Pipeline in May. In August, Houthi drones struck Saudi Arabia’s Shaybah oil field. ___ Associated Press writers Samy Magdy in Cairo and Anne D’Innocenzio in New York contributed to this report. Jon Gambrell, The Associated Press

UAW to let GM contract lapse, raising likelihood of strike

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:49
DETROIT - The United Auto Workers union is letting its contract with General Motors expire at 11:59 p.m., increasing the likelihood of a strike as early as Sunday night. Citing significant differences with the company on wages, health care and other issues, union Vice-President Terry Dittes (DIT-ez) tells local union officials in a letter that a decision on whether to strike will be made Sunday. The union says in a letter to GM that union members will report for regular shifts on Sunday. Both letters were obtained Saturday by The Associated Press. Dittes says in the letter to union officials that they’ll be working until the deadline in an effort to reach an agreement. But he says they’re also far apart on use of temporary employees, job security and profit sharing. The Associated Press

CPL Roundup: Kadin Chung lifts Victoria’s Pacific FC over FC Edmonton 1-0

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:14
EDMONTON - Kadin Chung scored in the 28th minute as Victoria’s Pacific FC beat FC Edmonton 1-0 on Saturday in Canadian Premier League action. Ben Fisk and Zachary Verhoven each had three shots, one on target, for Pacific FC (4-5-3). Tomi Ameobi had three shots, one on target, for FC Edmonton (3-4-5).   The Canadian Press

White House says bin Laden son killed in US operation

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:11
WASHINGTON - The White House announced Saturday that Hamza bin Laden , the son of the late al-Qaida leader who had become an increasingly prominent figure in the terrorist organization, was killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region. A statement issued in President Donald Trump’s name gave no further details, such as when Hamza bin Laden was killed or how the United States had confirmed his death. Administration officials would provide no more information beyond the three-sentence statement from the White House. American officials have said there are indications that the CIA, not the U.S. military, conducted the strike. The CIA declined comment on whether the agency was involved. The White House statement said Hamza bin Laden’s death “not only deprives al-Qaida of important leadership skills and the symbolic connection to his father, but undermines important operational activities of the group.” It said Osama bin Laden’s son “was responsible for planning and dealing with various terrorist groups.” The U.S. officials had suspected this summer that Hamza bin Laden was dead, based on intelligence reports and the fact that he had not been heard from in some time. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters. Defence Secretary Mark Esper told Fox News Channel in a late August interview that it was “my understanding” that Hamza bin Laden was dead. A U.S. official familiar with the case who spoke on condition of anonymity about intelligence-gathering said bin laden was killed in the past 18 months. Confirming such a high-profile death can take a long time, said the official, who declined to say what led the U.S. to report bin Laden’s death with certainty. The younger bin Laden had been viewed as an eventual heir to the leadership of al-Qaida, and the group’s leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, had praised him in a 2015 video that appeared on jihadi websites, calling him a “lion from the den of al-Qaida.” Bin Laden’s death leaves Zawahiri with the challenge of finding a different successor. The U.S. government in February said it was offering $1 million for help tracking down Hamza bin Laden as part of the State Department’s Rewards for Justice program. The department’s notice said he was married to a daughter of Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah, an al-Qaida leader and Egyptian charged for his role in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa. They were said to have two children, Osama and Khairiah, named after his parents. He was named a “specially designated global terrorist” in January 2017, and he had released audio and video messages calling for attacks against the U.S. and its allies. To mark one 9-11 anniversary, al-Qaida superimposed a childhood photo of him over a photo of the World Trade Center. Video released by the CIA in 2017 that was seized during the 2011 U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden showed Hamza bin Laden with a trimmed moustache but no beard at his wedding. Previous images have only shown him as a child. Hamza bin Laden is believed to have been born in 1989, the year of the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan, where his father became known among the mujahedeen fighters. His father returned to Saudi Arabia and later fled to Sudan after criticizing the kingdom for allowing U.S. troops to deploy in the country during the 1991 Gulf War. He later fled Sudan for Afghanistan in 1996, where he declared war against the U.S. As al-Qaida’s leader, Osama bin Laden oversaw attacks that included the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, as well as the bombing of the USS Cole off Yemen. He and others plotted and executed the 2001 attacks against the United States that led to the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. U.S. Navy SEALs killed the elder bin Laden in a raid on a house in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in 2011. This past March, Saudi Arabia announced that it had revoked the citizenship of Hamza bin Laden. The kingdom stripped Osama bin Laden’s citizenship in 1994 while he was living in exile in Sudan when Hamza bin Laden was just a child. It was unclear where Hamza bin Laden was at the time of the Saudi action. Hamza bin Laden began appearing in militant videos and recordings in 2015 as an al-Qaida spokesman. “If you think that your sinful crime that you committed in Abbottabad has passed without punishment, then you thought wrong,” he said in his first audio recording. After the Sept. 11 attacks, a U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan sought to topple the Taliban, an ally of al-Qaida, and seize the elder bin Laden. He escaped and split from his family as he crossed into Pakistan. Hamza was 12 when he saw his father for the last time - receiving a parting gift of prayer beads. “It was as if we pulled out our livers and left them there,” he wrote of the separation. Hamza and his mother followed other al-Qaida members into Pakistan and then Iran, where other al-Qaida leaders hid them, according to experts and analysis of documents seized after U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Iran later put the al-Qaida members on its soil into custody. During this time, Hamza married. In March 2010, Hamza and others left Iranian custody. He went to Pakistan’s Waziristan province, where he asked for weapons training, according to a letter to the elder bin Laden. His mother left for Abbottabad, joining her husband in his hideout. On May 2, 2011, the Navy SEAL team raided Abbottabad, killing Osama bin Laden and his son Khalid, as well as others. Saber and other wives living in the house were imprisoned. Hamza again disappeared. In August 2015, a video emerged on jihadi websites of al-Zawahri introducing “a lion from the den of al-Qaida” - Hamza bin Laden. Since then, Hamza had been featured in al-Qaida messages, delivering speeches on everything from the war in Syria to Donald Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia on his first foreign trip as president. But he hadn’t been heard from since a message in March 2018, in which he threatened the rulers of Saudi Arabia. ___ Associated Press writers Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Lolita C. Baldor in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and Deb Riechmann in Washington contributed to this report. Zeke Miller, The Associated Press

Longshot El Tormenta rallies to capture $1-million Ricoh Woodbine Mile

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 16:02
TORONTO - El Tormenta, a 44/1 longshot, held off favourite Got Stormy to capture the Grade 1 $1-million Ricoh Woodbine Mile on Saturday at Woodbine Racetrack. El Tormenta, owned and bred by Sam-Son Farm with Woodbine regular Eurico Rosa da Silva aboard, withstood a strong challenge from the 3/2 favourite for the half-length win in 1:32.60 on a good E.P. Taylor turf course. El Tormenta, a four-year-old gelding, not only captured the $600,000 winner’s share but also qualified for the Breeders’ Cup Mile on Nov. 2 at Santa Anita Park. Got Stormy was second in the 11-horse field, with Raging Bull moving up from fourth to third after third-place finisher Lucullan was disqualified following a stewards inquiry at race’s end and relegated to fourth. Also on Saturday’s card was the Grade 1 $300,000 Northern Dancer, a 1 1/2-mile turf event with a six-horse field. The Canadian Press

Hockey fans in Paradise, N.L., buzzing with excitement over Leafs training camp

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 15:58
PARADISE, N.L. - It’s a hockey fan’s paradise this weekend as the Toronto Maple Leafs hold their annual training camp in Paradise, N.L. Fans lined up around the block in the early hours of Friday and Saturday to snag free tickets to practices and scrimmages at the Paradise Double Ice Complex, about 20 minutes west of St. John’s. As events wrapped up on Saturday afternoon, fans shared excitement over the chance to watch their favourite players. Decked out in blue and white jerseys, Cory Mitchell and Jennifer Mitchell were at the arena with their twin baby boys, Austin and Clarke, named after Leafs players Auston Matthews and Wendel Clark. “The Leafs are in town, (we) just had to come out today to make sure they were a part of it,” Cory Mitchell said of his sons’ early introduction to Maple Leafs fandom. Excitement grew over the weekend with news of forward Mitch Marner’s six-year contract, averaging more than US$10 million annually. Marner joined his teammates on Saturday afternoon. Mitchell commented on the positive buzz and excitement around town with the beloved team visiting the Rock. “Seems like everybody here in Newfoundland is enjoying them being here, myself included and these guys as well,” he said.  The Maple Leafs thanked local fans for their “incredible support” on their official Twitter account Saturday, posting videos of the long lines in Paradise and of the “full house” inside the arena. Matthews told reporters on Friday he was enjoying the province and meeting the fans, though he admitted to some struggle understanding local accents and slang. The training camp in Paradise runs until Sunday afternoon, ending with a community barbecue before an alumni game Sunday evening. The team will also play a sold-out exhibition game in St. John’s on Tuesday. The Canadian Press

Intelligence official charged seemed to be ‘exemplar of discretion’: former colleague

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 15:55
A professor who once worked with an RCMP intelligence official charged with breaching Canada’s secrets law says the man seemed to be an “exemplar of discretion.” Paul Evans, a political science professor at the University of British Columbia, says he served on Cameron Ortis’s doctoral dissertation committee and worked with him on several projects. Ortis, 47, was arrested on Thursday and charged under three sections of the Security of Information Act as well as two Criminal Code provisions. He’s accused of trying to disclose classified information to a foreign entity or terrorist group. An insider familiar with the case, but not authorized to speak about it publicly, has said Ortis had served in a civilian position as director general of an RCMP intelligence unit. Evans says he worked with Ortis at UBC over the course of several years, and they later met socially from time to time. He says that after Ortis took up his RCMP position in Ottawa, he never discussed the specifics of his work. “He did not discuss the details of his work and throughout was an exemplar of discretion and integrity in our interactions,” he said in a written statement.  “Nothing in my experience with Cameron would lead me to suspect he would be any way involved in activities that would lead to such charges,” he added. “Like others who know him well, I was shocked by the news of the arrest of a very fine Canadian.” Ortis had been a political science graduate student starting in 1999, finishing his PhD at UBC in 2006, Evans said. The pair worked together on training programs for junior researchers from policy institutes in Asia, which included two essays they published together. Evans said the essays, published in 2002 and 2003, were about ways “the internet was being used for positive and negative purposes in the region.”  Another UBC colleague, political science professor Brian Job, has also said he was surprised by news of Ortis’s arrest. “Nothing in my experience with Cameron would lead me to suspect his alleged involvement in the activities for which he charged,” Job said on Friday. “Indeed, the exact opposite is true.” The Canadian Press

CP NewsAlert: El Tormenta wins Woodbine Mile

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 15:49
TORONTO - El Tormenta wins Woodbine Mile. El Tormenta was neck-and-neck with early favourite Got Stormy before winning the third jewel in the Canadian Triple Crown. More coming. The Canadian Press

Yemen’s Houthi rebels launch drones on 2 big Saudi oil sites

Sat, 09/14/2019 - 15:48
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Yemen’s Houthi rebels launched drone attacks on the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia and a major oil field Saturday, sparking huge fires at a vulnerable chokepoint for global energy supplies. The drone attacks affected up to half of the supplies from the world’s largest exporter of oil, though the output should be restored within days, multiple news outlets reported, citing unidentified sources. It was unclear whether anyone was injured at the Abqaiq oil processing facility and the Khurais oil field. The attacks follow weeks of similar drone assaults on the kingdom’s oil infrastructure, but none of the earlier strikes appeared to have caused the same amount of damage. The attacks likely will further increase tensions across the Persian Gulf amid an escalating crisis between the U.S. and Iran over its unraveling nuclear deal with world powers. The Iranian-backed Houthis, who hold Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, and other territory in the Arab world’s poorest country, took responsibility for the attacks in the war against a Saudi-led coalition that has fought since 2015 to reinstate the internationally recognized Yemeni government. But the U.S. blamed Iran, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeting, “There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen.” “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply,” Pompeo added. In a short address aired by the Houthi’s Al-Masirah satellite news channel, military spokesman Yahia Sarie said the rebels launched 10 drones after receiving “intelligence” support from those inside the kingdom. He warned that attacks by the rebels would only get worse if the war continues. “The only option for the Saudi government is to stop attacking us,” Sarie said. Houthi rebels have been using drones in combat since the start of the Saudi-led war. The first appeared to be off-the-shelf, hobby-kit-style drones. Later, versions nearly identical to Iranian models turned up. Iran denies supplying the Houthis with weapons, although the U.N., the West and Gulf Arab nations say Tehran does. U.N. investigators said the Houthis’ new UAV-X drone likely has a range of up to 1,500 kilometres (930 miles). That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in range. First word of Saturday’s assault came in online videos of giant fires at the Abqaiq facility, some 330 kilometres (205 miles) northeast of the Saudi capital, Riyadh. Machine-gun fire could be heard in several clips alongside the day’s first Muslim call to prayers, suggesting security forces tried to bring down the drones just before dawn. In daylight, Saudi state television aired a segment with its local correspondent near a police checkpoint, a thick plume of smoke visible behind him. In a statement carried by the state-run Saudi Press Agency, the Interior Ministry said an investigation was underway. Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil giant, did not respond to questions from The Associated Press. President Donald Trump called Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to offer his support for the kingdom’s defence, the White House said. The crown prince assured Trump that Saudi Arabia is “willing and able to confront and deal with this terrorist aggression,” according to a news release from the Saudi Embassy in Washington. The U.S. Embassy in Riyadh said it was unaware of any injuries to Americans. Saudi Aramco employs a number of U.S. citizens, some of whom live in guarded compounds near the site. Saudi Aramco describes its Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq as “the largest crude oil stabilization plant in the world.” The facility processes sour crude oil into sweet crude, then transports it onto transshipment points on the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea or to refineries for local production. Estimates suggest it can process up to 7 million barrels of crude oil a day. By comparison, Saudi Arabia produced 9.65 million barrels of crude oil a day in July. The Khurais oil field is believed to produce over 1 million barrels of crude oil a day. It has estimated reserves of over 20 billion barrels of oil, according to Aramco. There was no immediate impact on global oil prices as markets were closed for the weekend. Benchmark Brent crude had been trading at just above $60 a barrel. While Saudi Arabia has taken steps to protect itself and its oil infrastructure, analysts had warned that Abqaiq remained vulnerable. The Rapidan Energy Group, a Washington-based advisory group, warned in May that “a successful attack could lead to a monthslong disruption of most Saudi production and nearly all spare production.” It called Abqaiq, close to the eastern Saudi city of Dammam, “the most important oil facility in the world.” The war has become the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. The violence has pushed Yemen to the brink of famine and killed more than 90,000 people since 2015, according to the U.S.-based Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project, or ACLED, which tracks the conflict. The rebels have flown drones into the radar arrays of Saudi Arabia’s Patriot missile batteries, according to Conflict Armament Research, disabling them and allowing the Houthis to fire ballistic missiles into the kingdom unchallenged. The Houthis launched drone attacks targeting Saudi Arabia’s crucial East-West Pipeline in May. In August, Houthi drones struck Saudi Arabia’s Shaybah oil field. ___ Associated Press writer Samy Magdy in Cairo contributed to this report. Jon Gambrell, The Associated Press

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