News Talk 650 CKOM

Subscribe to News Talk 650 CKOM feed
Saskatoon's Number One News and Information Station - News, Talk, Sports, Traffic, and Weather
Updated: 19 min 34 sec ago

Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

31 min 4 sec ago
TOKYO - Japan’s government has apologized to tens of thousands of victims forcibly sterilized under a now-defunct Eugenics Protection Law and promised to pay compensation. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says he is offering “sincere remorse and heartfelt apology” to the victims. Japan’s parliament enacted legislation earlier Wednesday to provide redress measures, including 3.2 million yen ($28,600) compensation for each victim. An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996. The law allowed doctors to sterilize people with disabilities. The apology and the redress law follow a series of lawsuits by victims who came forward recently. The Associated Press

Slim majority vote ‘no’ to electoral reform in Prince Edward Island referendum

1 hour 34 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - A slim majority of Prince Edward Island voters have rejected a switch to a proportional representation electoral system, though it remains unclear how the province’s new government will respond. Voters in Tuesday’s general election were also asked to answer a referendum question: “Should Prince Edward Island change its voting system to a mixed member proportional voting system?” All parties had accepted that whichever side won more than 50 per cent of the votes cast in at least 17 of the 27 ridings would be declared the victor. By late Tuesday, the “No” side had captured close to 51 per cent of the total votes, with the “Yes” side holding 49 per cent. Two advance polls had yet to report. However, neither side had won 17 ridings, with the “Yes” victorious in 15 and “No” taking 12. Gerard Mitchell, the referendum commissioner, said in an interview earlier in the evening that if neither side reached the 17-seat threshold, “it means it wouldn’t be binding on government.” “If it’s close enough then I guess government, or whoever is governing, will have to make a decision.” The premier-designate, Tory Leader Dennis King, said Tuesday he would “leave it up the legislature.” Peter Bevan-Baker, the leader of the Green Party, which took eight seats and will form the opposition, said the result was “agonizingly close.” “I really would have liked P.E.I. to have been a pioneer here in adopting proportional representation,” he said. “But I think it is inevitable that proportional representation is coming. We are not going to be the ones leading that charge in Canada but we came very close and Islanders showed there was a level of discomfort with the status quo.” The leaders of all four political parties had said during a leaders’ debate they would consider the result binding if the thresholds were reached, but it was less clear what would happen if they were not achieved. The “Yes” option would mean a slimmed-down roster of 18 legislators in redrawn electoral districts, while citizens would also cast ballots for nine other legislators from lists the parties create. These “party list” seats would then be assigned proportionately based on the popular vote each party received on the second part of the ballots. A “No” win would retain the first-past-the-post system with 27 legislators elected. John Barrett, a spokesman for the “No” side, said he considered the result decisive and that the province should put the idea of a mixed member proportional system to rest. “I’m pleased that first-past-the-post will continue as our electoral system,” he said. He noted that the rural areas of the province had voted decisively, as they feared losing their representation under the new system. “Fifty-one per cent is a win and we’ll take it,” he said. However, Brenda Oslawsky, a spokeswoman for the “Yes” side, said that “we’re pleased we won a majority of the districts.” “We think with two leaders who’ve come out in favour of mixed member proportional … that they will look to strike a committee or bring in a citizens assembly to find a way to bring a proportional representation coming to the Island.” Advocates of proportional representation on the Island argued a large part of the population has been under-represented in past legislatures, which have often swung with lop-sided results for either the Liberal or Conservative parties. The “No” side argued the proposed system left too many questions unanswered, such as how parties will choose their lists of candidates. It also warned the system risks creating a series of unstable, minority governments without a fair representation of rural voters. Political scientists struggled to assess the outcome of the historic vote in the lead-up to the referendum, noting the two campaigns were relatively low key. Don Desserud, who teaches at the University of Prince Edward Island, has said many voters found themselves making up their minds on the referendum as they cast ballots for a new government, without having carefully considered a potentially historic change. Voters in British Columbia rejected making such a change to a mixed member proportional system in December. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to abolish the first-past-the-post federal voting system during the 2015 election, but he later abandoned the plan, saying Canadians were not eager for change. However, Quebec’s new CAQ government, which campaigned in part on the issue, has said it would move to adopt a mixed member proportional system before the next provincial election in 2022. - By Michael Tutton in Halifax. The Canadian Press

Voters in Prince Edward Island elect Tory minority amid Green surge

1 hour 38 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - Voters in P.E.I. have shed their century-old embrace of the Island’s two-party system, electing a Tory minority government and handing the upstart Green party official Opposition status for the first time. With all polls reporting Tuesday, the Tories had won 12 seats, the Greens held eight, and the incumbent Liberals, led by Premier Wade MacLauchlan, had won six. “Welcome to a new day in Prince Edward Island!” Tory Leader Dennis King told supporters, who immediately roared their approval. “Welcome to a new era of Island politics. Welcome to the tremendous honour and the tremendous responsibility of governing.” Remarking on the strong showing by the Greens, King said it showed that Island voters want their political parties to work together. “It shows that Prince Edward Island wants the parties to put partisanship behind them … to do what’s best for Prince Edward Island,” he told the crowd. Afterwards, King, who won his riding of Brackley-Hunter River, admitted he was overwhelmed by his party’s victory. “I’m equal parts excited and terrified,” he said. “This is a very surreal experience for me. I’ve come a long way, and the party has come a long way.”  The Tories finished with 37 per cent of the popular vote, followed by the Greens at 31 and the Liberals at 29. The NDP received just three per cent. Voter turnout was 77 per cent, a five-point drop from the 2015 election. The tight three-way race produced the province’s first minority government since 1890. The Greens had led in opinion polls since August, prompting speculation they could be poised to form Canada’s first Green government. Still, their strong showing on election night was a major breakthrough for a party that did not hold a seat in the legislature until 2015. That’s when party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker won a seat in a general election - after nine unsuccessful runs for office on the Island and in Ontario. “Islanders responded (to us) by granting us a record number of seats - by far the most seats ever by a Green party in Canada,” he told a boisterous crowd at the PEI Brewing Company in Charlottetown. “I’m a strong believer in the capacity of minority government to create a collaborative environment.” King, a 47-year-old former journalist and consultant, was elected to lead his party only two months ago. The Tories enjoyed a boost in the polls last month, leaving them in a virtual dead heat with the Greens and Liberals as the campaign began. The Tory victory on the Island represents the latest in a series of gains for right-leaning parties, including wins in Alberta, Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario - all within the last year. Earlier this year, the Island’s Progressive Conservatives were largely regarded as a dysfunctional organization, having churned through no less than six leaders in the past eight years. Despite past infighting within Tory ranks, King was lauded for running a solid campaign, mainly by reinforcing a relentlessly positive message - a tried-and-true tactic among Island politicians. A former communications director for former Tory premier Pat Binns, King performed well on the hustings and in a series of decidedly polite leaders debates. However, the rookie leader’s run for office was marred by a mild controversy over a series of tweets that were supposed to be funny, but instead offended some, who criticized them for being sexist and homophobic. King, who also describes himself as a comedian and story-teller, admitted that some of the tweets were inappropriate. Among other things, King promised to expand beer and wine sales to convenience stores. Access to family doctors emerged as a key issue in the campaign. All four parties talked about recruiting more physicians. According to Health PEI, there are 13,083 Islanders on the waiting list for a family doctor  The Greens’ rise in popularity generated a national buzz during an otherwise lacklustre campaign. During the race, Bevan-Baker - a Scottish-born dentist - tried to persuade Islanders that the Greens care about more than just the environment, offering a platform that focused on a range of social issues, including a pledge to raise social assistance rates. The 56-year-old Green leader won his riding of New Haven-Rocky Point. The Liberals were seeking a fourth term in office, having repeatedly reminded Islanders that the province’s economy remains the strongest in the country. MacLauchlan, 64, failed to win his seat. “It’s simple: the tide turned. We’ve had four years of good government, responsible government and exceptionally good management of the province’s finances,” he told reporters. “We left no stone unturned. We presented good policy. We presented a good team and we went and did the work that candidates do.”  It wouldn’t be a stretch to say P.E.I. is on a tear, posting impressive numbers for higher wages, employment, immigration, housing starts, exports, retail sales and tourism. However, voters appeared reluctant to give MacLauchlan credit for boosting the economy, a sentiment that was reflected in his relatively low personal popularity ratings. The Island’s New Democrats, led by 57-year-old Joe Byrne, were not in contention in any ridings. When the legislature was dissolved, the Liberals held 16 seats in the 27-seat legislature, the Tories had eight and Greens had two seats. There was one Independent. A total of 14 seats are needed for a majority, but only 26 of the 27 seats were contested Tuesday. On Saturday, Elections P.E.I. postponed the vote in the district of Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park following the deaths of Green party candidate Josh Underhay and his young son in a boating mishap on the Hillsborough River. Bevan-Baker began his address to supporters with an emotional tribute to Underhay. “I don’t think I’ve ever felt so overwhelmed by joy and grief simultaneously,” he said. A byelection will be held in the riding within the next three months. Aside from the election outcome, voters cast ballots in a referendum on electoral reform. Preliminary results suggested they had declined to endorse the switch to proportional representation, though the results were close. Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version reported that the Greens had won nine seats and the Liberals five.

Bill Cosby fighting $1M a month legal bill in arbitration

1 hour 43 min ago
PHILADELPHIA - A fee dispute between actor Bill Cosby and one of the many law firms hired to address his legal problems shows the Los Angeles firm alone was billing Cosby $1 million a month in the run-up to his first sex assault trial. The imprisoned Cosby is challenging a California arbitration award that upholds nearly $7 million of the $9.2 million billed by Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan for nine months work. Cosby, 81, accused the firm in a petition Friday of elder abuse and “egregious” billing practices, and of fraud for representing both him and the insurance company he was fighting in court, American International Group Inc., over his coverage. The Quinn Emanuel team was led by partner Christopher Tayback, the son of the late actor Vic Tayback. Quinn Emanuel had been retained to represent Cosby in three lawsuits in late 2015, but eventually had 28 lawyers working on 10 cases involving 14 accusers across the country as Cosby’s legal woes snowballed. The lawyers made about $500 to $1,075 per hour. Cosby paid the firm $2 million while AIG kicked in $2.3 million, the documents show. The arbitration panel this year upheld $6.7 million in fees, leaving Cosby with a bill of about $2.4 million. His petition seeks a review of that decision and a refund of the money he paid. The Quinn Emanuel team was among more than a dozen lawyers to help Cosby defend a dizzying array of legal problems across the country as dozens of women came forward to accuse him of sexual misconduct or defamation. Cosby said he never knew the scope of the firm’s work - in part because of his age and blindness - as it began exploding after his December 2015 arrest in Pennsylvania. The arbiters found Quinn Emanuel had kept Cosby’s personal lawyer informed along the way. The firm worked on the criminal case beside lead lawyer Brian McMonagle and others before parting ways with Cosby in mid 2016, long before the first criminal trial the next year. Cosby was convicted at a 2018 retrial of drugging and molesting a woman at his Philadelphia-area home in 2004. He is serving a three- to 10-year prison term and appealing the conviction. Over nine months of work, Quinn Emanuel said it racked up more than 11,000 hours of legal work, along with costs including $300,000 in online searches and $48,000 for a lawyer’s work reading two gossip novels and a book about the Playboy Mansion, where one of the alleged Cosby assaults occurred. The retired judges on the arbitration panel rejected those two items. Quinn Emanuel filings suggest that Cosby and his wife Camille helped drive the legal costs higher, insisting, for instance, that the firm fight efforts to depose her in a Massachusetts defamation case, when they suggested she go and invoke marital privilege in declining to answer certain questions. In the end, the prolonged fight absorbed cost $500,000, and she eventually sat for the deposition over two days. Dozens of lawyers bounced in and out of the Cosbys’ orbit in recent years, and at least one other firm has gone to court seeking payment. Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, a Philadelphia-based firm, sued Cosby over $244,000 in bills that Cosby called largely unauthorized. That case was settled confidentially in January. Quinn Emanuel did not return messages seeking comment this week. Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt said he has not been involved in the fee dispute and had no comment. Cosby was fighting his insurer, AIG, to get it to cover defamation lawsuits filed against him by 10 women accusers, while AIG argued its policies excluded sexual misconduct claims. “AIG’s goal . was to prove that (Cosby) engaged in intentional misconduct that precluded coverage, whereas Cosby’s goal . is to prove he did not engage in intentional misconduct,” Cosby complained in the petition. AIG settled defamation lawsuits earlier this month that were filed by seven Cosby accusers in Massachusetts, after losing a legal battle over their duty to defend Cosby in those cases. A lawsuit filed by another woman accusing Cosby of drugging and molesting her at a party at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles was settled last week . Maryclaire Dale, The Associated Press

Alec Baldwin is passionate about preserving the planet

1 hour 44 min ago
Actor Alec Baldwin says his passion about preserving the planet for future generations was sparked by meeting indigenous people who are guardians of their lands at the 2015 Paris conference that adopted the landmark agreement to tackle global warming. Baldwin was at U.N. headquarters Tuesday night to moderate a panel on threats to “Forest Defenders” on the sidelines of the annual meeting of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. He told several journalists he finds it “very, very unsettling” that indigenous people who understand better than anyone else the places where they live face strong opposition from those in power who want “to get rid of them by whatever means necessary” and control the natural resources on their lands. Baldwin pointed to killings of indigenous activists. The Associated Press

Pillar drives in a run, Giants hit four homers to power past Blue Jays

1 hour 56 min ago
TORONTO - Joe Panik homered and drove in three runs, Kevin Pillar had an RBI in his return to Rogers Centre, and the San Francisco Giants held off a late Toronto comeback attempt to defeat the Blue Jays 7-6 on Tuesday in the opener of a two-game interleague series. Pablo Sandoval, Brandon Belt and Evan Longoria also hit home runs as San Francisco (10-14) build a 7-2 lead. But Rowdy Tellez hit an eighth-inning grand slam for the Blue Jays (11-13) to make it a one-run game. Eric Sogard extended his hit streak to six games with a solo homer and Socrates Brito had an RBI triple in Toronto’s first loss in five games. Will Smith shut down the Jays in the ninth to pick up his sixth save. Tuesday marked Pillar’s first game in Toronto since the centre-fielder was traded to the Giants on April 2. Pillar had played seven seasons as a Blue Jay and was selected by the team in the 32nd round of the 2011 draft. The Jays honoured Pillar with a video tribute in the first inning, which he watched from the field while receiving a standing ovation. The 30-year-old tipped his cap to fans when it was over. He also received loud applause from the crowd of 20,384 before his first at-bat in the second inning, which resulted in an RBI single to bring in San Francisco’s first run. Jeff Samardzija (2-1) allowed two runs and five hits with a walk and four strikeouts over 5 2/3 innings. Rookie right-hander Trent Thornton (0-3) allowed four runs with six hits and five strikeouts over five innings. Panik gave the Giants a 4-1 lead in the fifth inning, sending a solo blast into the centre-field seats. It was the first home run of the season for San Francisco’s nine-hole hitter, who came into the game with a measly .177 batting average. Panik earned his first two RBI’s of the game on a two-run double in the second that followed Pillar’s run-scoring single. The Giants jumped on Thornton with four straight two-out hits in the frame en route to a 3-0 lead. Toronto got on the board in the bottom of the second when a Brito triple - just his second hit in his first 25 at-bats as a Blue Jay - plated Tellez. Longoria hit a solo homer off reliever Thomas Pannone in the sixth to extend San Francisco’s lead to 5-1, but Sogard cut the deficit to 5-2 with his first homer of the season in the bottom of the sixth. The infielder came into Tuesday batting .409 in his first five games since being recalled from triple-A Buffalo last week.  Belt’s eighth-inning homer, also off Pannone, restored San Francisco’s four-goal cushion and Sandoval followed with a solo bomb off Daniel Hudson for a 7-2 lead. NOTES: The teams close out the two-game series Wednesday afternoon. Right-hander Clay Buchholz will start for Toronto while the Giants counter with lefty Drew Pomeranz. … The Blue Jays announced before the game that No. 2 prospect Bo Bichette sustained a broken left hand when he was hit by a pitch on Monday night. … Toronto’s Freddy Galvis made a pinch-hit appearance in the ninth, extending his iron-man streak to 349 games. Melissa Couto, The Canadian Press

Slim majority vote ‘no’ to electoral reform in Prince Edward Island referendum

2 hours 23 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - A slim majority of voters in Prince Edward Island have rejected a switch to a proportional representation electoral system, though it remains unclear how the province’s new government will respond. Voters in the general election were asked to answer the question: “Should Prince Edward Island change its voting system to a mixed member proportional voting system?” All parties had accepted that whichever side won more than 50 per cent of the votes cast in at least 17 of the 27 ridings would be declared the victor. By late Tuesday, the “No” side had captured close to almost 51 per cent of the total votes, with the “Yes” holding 49 per cent. However, neither side had won 17 ridings, with the “Yes” victorious in 15 and “No” taking 12. Gerard Mitchell, the referendum commissioner, said if neither side reaches 17 seats, “it means it wouldn’t be binding on government.” “If it’s close enough then I guess government, or whoever is governing, will have to make a decision.” The premier-designate, Tory Leader Dennis King, said Tuesday he would “leave it up the legislature.” The leaders of all four political parties had said during a leaders’ debate they would consider the result binding if the thresholds were reached, but it’s not clear what happens if they’re not achieved. The “Yes” option would mean a slimmed-down roster of 18 legislators in redrawn electoral districts, while citizens would also cast ballots for nine other legislators from lists the parties create. These “party list” seats would then be assigned proportionately based on the popular vote each party received on the second part of the ballots. A “No” win would retain the first-past-the-post system with 27 legislators elected. During a recent debate, the leaders of the provincial Green party, the NDP and the Progressive Conservatives said they personally favoured the “Yes” option, while Liberal Premier Wade MacLauchlan declined to give a personal preference. All four leaders committed to honour the result of the vote if either side met the threshold in the Electoral System Referendum Act. Advocates of proportional representation on the Island argued a large part of the population has been under-represented in past legislatures, which have often swung with lop-sided results for either the Liberal or Conservative parties. The “No” side argued the proposed system left too many questions unanswered, such as how parties will choose their lists of candidates. It also warned the system risks creating a series of unstable, minority governments without a fair representation of rural voters. Political scientists struggled to assess the outcome of the historic vote in the lead-up to the referendum, noting the two campaigns were relatively low key. Don Desserud, who teaches at the University of Prince Edward Island, has said the referendum has been overshadowed by the wider provincial campaign - with the surge by the third-party Greens capturing public attention. Desserud says he believes many voters found themselves making up their minds on the referendum as they cast ballots for a new government, without having carefully considered a potentially historic change. Voters in British Columbia rejected making such a change to a mixed member proportional system in December. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to abolish the first-past-the-post federal voting system during the 2015 election, but he later abandoned the plan, saying Canadians were not eager for change. However, Quebec’s new CAQ government, which campaigned in part on the issue, has said it would move to adopt a mixed member proportional system before the next provincial election in 2022. - By Michael Tutton in Halifax. The Canadian Press

Bruins victory over Leafs ensures an American team will hoist the Stanley Cup

2 hours 24 min ago
TORONTO - Many NHL players were either not yet born or too young to remember the last time a Canadian team hoisted the Stanley Cup. That trend will continue for a 25th NHL season after all three Canadian teams were eliminated in the opening round of the 2018-19 playoffs. The Boston Bruins defeated Toronto 5-1 in Game 7 of their Eastern Conference quarterfinal on Tuesday, sending the Maple Leafs to join the Calgary Flames and Winnipeg Jets among the post-seasons early exits. The Ottawa Senators, Montreal Canadiens, Edmonton Oilers and Vancouver Canucks did not qualify for the playoffs. The last Canadian team to win the Cup was the 1993 edition of the Montreal Canadiens. The inauspicious streak has been threatened a few times - Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver each made it to Game 7 of a Cup final before being eliminated, while Ottawa also made it to a final series - but this season will mark the eighth straight time two American teams will compete for the iconic trophy. The only time an American team hasn’t been awarded a Cup after the 1993 final was the lost 2004-05 season that was scrapped due to a lockout. The nadir of Canada’s sad streak came in 2016, when not a single one of Canada’s seven NHL teams qualified for the playoffs. It initially looked like the Canadian curse was in danger of being lifted when these playoffs commenced. Calgary entered the post-season as the top team in the Western Conference. Winnipeg and Toronto struggled in the last stage of the regular season, but the Jets were playoff-tested coming off a Western Conference final appearance last season, and the Maple Leafs boasted a deep offence that added John Tavares to a group already including Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner. In the end, it turned out to be the same story for Canada’s NHL teams. Calgary was dumped by Colorado in five games after shutting out the Avalanche in the series opener. Winnipeg was defeated three times at home in falling to rising St. Louis in six games. The Leafs battled gamely, but missed a chance to win the series at home before losing in seven to Boston for the second straight season, and the third time in the last seven years. Canada’s teams will have their chances next season. Calgary, Toronto and Winnipeg are all safe bets to return to the post-season. Montreal, which drastically improved in 2018-19 and battled for a playoff spot until the second-last day of the regular-season, could join them. Vancouver, with an exciting core of young talent including Elias Pettersson and Quinn Hughes, could make the jump next season, and one would think eventually Connor McDavid will put the underachieving Oilers on his broad shoulders and lead them back into the post-season. Ottawa, whose struggles on and off the ice are well documented, is unlikely to push for a playoff spot as it continues its rebuilding process. What was life like the last time a Canadian team won the Cup? Nokia was the top manufacturer of mobile phones, personal computers were running the Windows 3.1 operating system, social media didn’t exist, “Unforgiven” had just won best picture at the Academy Awards, Janet Jackson’s “The Way Love Goes” topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart and Tiger Woods was two months away from winning his third straight U.S. Junior Amateur Championship. The Canadian Press

Raptors are onto the conference semifinals with 115-96 rout of Orlando

2 hours 28 min ago
TORONTO - The Toronto Raptors dispatched the Orlando Magic in record time, checking the first box of what the team hopes is a long playoff run. Kawhi Leonard scored 27 points as Toronto throttled Orlando 115-96 on Tuesday, winning an opening-round playoff series in five games for the first time in franchise history. Toronto will face the winner of the Philadelphia and Brooklyn series. The Sixers took a 3-1 lead into Tuesday’s game. Pascal Siakam scored 24 points for the Raptors, who led by as many as 37 points in the dying minutes. Kyle Lowry had 12 of his 14 points in the first quarter and doled out nine assists, Norman Powell chipped in with 11 points and Serge Ibaka finished with 10. D.J. Augustin led Orlando with 15 points. Lowry and the Raptors clearly had no interest in flying back to Orlando for a Game 6. Coming off a pair of victories on the Magic’s Amway Center court, Lowry scored the team’s first nine points and the Raptors pounced on the overmatched Magic from the opening tip. The Magic were virtual spectators as Toronto sprinted to a 24-point lead late in the first quarter. The team’s 19 assists on 23 made field goals in the first half was a post-season franchise record. Orlando, which was making its first post-season appearance in seven years, missed its first 11 three-point attempts before Evan Fournier finally connected more than four minutes into the second quarter. The Raptors led by 31 points in the third and cruised into the fourth up 99-70 in front a soldout Scotiabank Arena crowd of 19,800 fans that included Toronto rapper Drake - putting a dent in the “Drake curse” theory. The crowd serenaded Leonard with chants of “M-V-P!” when the Raptors star was subbed out of the game with just under eight minutes to play. Coach Nick Nurse went deep into his bench the rest of the way. Lowry and Fred VanVleet (with 10) combined for 19 assists, as the Raptors had 34 assists to Orlando’s 20. Toronto also held Orlando to 26.5 per cent shooting from three-point range.  Nurse said the key to Tuesday’s game was to lock down on the defensive end from the get-go. “I think the main emphasis tonight is to try to do it over the course of the 48 minutes,” he said. On a big night for Toronto sports, the Maple Leafs were facing Boston in a do-or-die game. The score was periodically flashed on the Jumbotron, and most of the TV screens on the concourse were dialled into the Leafs game. With big dreams of reaching the NBA Finals, the Raptors now have a precious few days of breathing room - and one less trip to Orlando - until the Eastern Conference semifinals begin this weekend. And with a roster rife with injuries, plus Leonard’s load management, in the regular-season, they could use it. In Toronto’s most successful post-season in 2016, the Raptors needed seven games to knock off both Indiana and Miami before facing a rested LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in the conference final. Orlando upset Toronto to win the opener before the Raptors roared back to capture the next three, including a pair of victories at Orlando’s Amway Center. Lowry, who’d taken grief for scoring zero points in Game 1, could barely miss in the first quarter on Tuesday, shooting an efficient 5-for-6 from the field. The Raptors shot 63 per cent from three-point range, while Orlando missed all seven of their long-range attempt. Toronto led 35-19 to start the second. The Magic made a run against Toronto’s bench to pull to within 11 points early in the second, but it was shortlived, and the Raptors took a 67-47 advantage into the halftime break. Toronto will host Games 1 and 2 of the next round. Lori Ewing, The Canadian Press

Bruins down Maple Leafs 5-1 in another Game 7; No Canadian playoff teams left

2 hours 31 min ago
BOSTON - Tuukka Rask made 32 saves as the Boston Bruins downed the Toronto Maple Leafs 5-1 on Tuesday to win their best-of-seven Eastern Conference quarterfinal 4-3. Sean Kuraly and Joakim Nordstrom, with a goal and an assist each, and Marcus Johansson scored for Boston before Charlie Coyle and Patrice Bergeron both added empty-net goals. John Tavares replied for Toronto. Frederik Andersen stopped 27-of-30 shots. The Bruins have now defeated the Leafs in Game 7 in the opening round of the playoffs three of the last seven seasons, with each clincher coming at TD Garden. Boston also took down Toronto 7-4 last spring, becoming the first team in NHL history to battle back from three deficits of at least one goal to win a Game 7 in regulation. That came five years after the Bruins’ 5-4 overtime victory in 2013 - the first time a team had won a Game 7 after trailing by three goals in the third period. The crushing result for the Leafs means more heartbreak for a franchise that has failed to advance to the second round of the playoffs since 2004 and has not won the Stanley Cup since 1967. The Bruins will now take on the Columbus Blue Jackets after the conference’s eighth seed swept the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Tampa Bay Lightning in the first round. That alone makes Tuesday a bitter pill to swallow for the Leafs, with Tampa just one of a number of favourites to have already fallen by the wayside. Toronto was Canada’s last hope of ending a 26-year Cup drought following the elimination of both the Calgary Flames and Winnipeg Jets. The series was a back-and-forth slugfest featuring razor-thin margins. Neither team managed to put together consecutive victories until the Bruins won 4-2 in Game 6 on Sunday to stave off elimination in Toronto before taking Tuesday’s winner-take-all showdown. The Leafs actually started well enough after enduring an early Boston flurry. Rask stopped an Auston Matthews one-timer from the slot and two quick Mitch Marner shots off the rush before the roof caved in. Toronto defenceman Travis Dermott turned the puck over on a clearing attempt and the puck eventually fell to Nordstrom, who squeezed his second of the series between Andersen’s glove and pad on the shortside with 5:31 left in the first as Boston’s fourth line struck. Jake Gardiner - Dermott’s blue-line partner - then inexplicably played the puck off the boards behind his own net to no one in particular. It was quickly scooped up by Johansson, and he wheeled out in front before beating Andersen on a shot off the far post for his first with 2:14 remaining in the period. Gardiner, who missed a chunk of the second half of the season with a back injury, was an ugly minus-5 in last spring’s Game 7 loss to Boston, falling on his sword and taking more than his share of the blame in an emotional exchange with reporters as the cameras rolled. The Leafs responded well to open Tuesday’s second period, with Tyler Ennis separating John Moore from the puck along the boards and finding Tavares, who buried his second beyond Rask’s blocker at 3:54. Toronto kept coming with a number of chances, but Rask denied Ennis and Trevor Moore from in close. A Leafs power play that was just 3 for 14 coming into Game 7 got a chance midway through the period, but despite a wrinkle that saw Matthews and Marner switch sides, were unable to connect. The Bruins came with a push to start the third period, and Kuraly made Toronto pay when stepped around Ron Hainsey in the neutral zone and beat Andersen with his first of the playoffs on a shot over his left shoulder that the Leafs goalie will want back at 2:40. Toronto got its second power play five minutes into the third, but couldn’t do anything with the man advantage. TD Garden then roared its approval as the minutes and seconds ticked down towards another Game 7 victory for the Bruins over their rivals before Coyle made it 4-1 into an empty net. Notes: The Bruins improved to 15-12 in Game 7s, including 14-8 at home. The Leafs dropped to 12-12 (5-11 on the road). … Boston’s 15 victories in Game 7s gives the franchise the NHL’s all-time lead, passing Montreal (14-9) and Detroit (14-11). … Bruins captain defenceman Zdeno Chara played the 13th Game 7 of his career, tying Patrick Roy and Scott Stevens for the most all-time. ___ Follow @JClipperton_CP on Twitter  Joshua Clipperton, The Canadian Press

Commemorative loonie marking progress for LGBTQ2 people unveiled in Toronto

2 hours 39 min ago
TORONTO - The Royal Canadian Mint unveiled a commemorative loonie Tuesday to mark what it called a key milestone for lesbian, gay, transgender, queer and two-spirited people, with the government saying the coin symbolized progress while highlighting the work that still needs to be done to advance equality. Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau was amongst a number of dignitaries who gathered in Toronto to unveil the new one-dollar coin that pays tribute to Parliament’s passing of legislation that “initiated the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada” in 1969. The coin, which is now in circulation, combines the words “Equality-Egalite” with the work of Vancouver-based artist Joe Average. “For too long, people didn’t listen. They didn’t extend compassion or empathy or understanding,” Morneau said. “Because of that, years ago, people made it a crime to love in Canada. We made being yourself a punishable offence.” Morneau also acknowledged the views of those who’ve said the coin’s theme suggests the work to achieve equality is complete. “They recognize, as we should all recognize, that we are not at the end of this path,” he said. “We have much more to do.”  Some historians and advocates attending the coin’s unveiling said the new loonie mistakenly suggests equality has been achieved and largely as a result of the federal government’s actions. York University historian Tom Hooper, who is part of the group, said LGBTQ2 people faced continued criminalization over the decades that followed the 1969 legislative changes. “Decriminalization is actually a myth,” he said. “No laws were repealed in 1969. I think that’s a common misconception … Instead, they added a reform. They allowed us to commit these crimes provided we did so under strict circumstances.” He said discrimination against LGBTQ people persists today, noting as examples that trans and queer people of colour still face issues with policing and people with HIV remain subject to criminalization. The mint “could have consulted people who have knowledge of this history but they didn’t,” Hooper said, adding he hopes the agency will do so in the future. He acknowledged no campaign can compete with roughly three million coins but said the project is at least fuelling a public conversation about LGBTQ2 history. “As a historian, I’m hoping to inform as many people as I can about our history. So in some ways the coin is opening up that opportunity,” he said. Rev. Brent Hawkes, a pastor and gay rights activist who spoke at the coin unveiling, said while the legal changes in 1969 were not perfect, they are worthy of celebration. “When you have laws hanging over your head that say when you love someone very, very much and you practice consensual sex with that other adult person you could be thrown in jail, that is significant,” he said.  “In 1969, the government passed a law to end that piece of the terror … And while it’s not perfect, we should not diminish the significance of that moment.” Mint president Marie Lemay said coins made by the agency end up in the pockets and purses of Canadians across the country and contribute to ongoing discussions about the country’s identity. The new coin unveiled today is “inspirational”, she said. “It’s our hope that this coin will spark conversation,” she said. “I see this morning it already has and spurred reflection on 50 years of progress, while acknowledging … that the journey towards full equality for Canadians of all genders, identities, and sexual orientations was hard fought and is not yet over.” Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

Voters in Prince Edward Island elect Tory minority amid Green surge

2 hours 41 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - Voters in P.E.I. have shed their century-old embrace of the Island’s two-party system, electing a Tory minority government and handing the upstart Green party official Opposition status for the first time. With all polls reporting Tuesday, the Tories had won 12 seats, the Greens held nine, and the incumbent Liberals, led by Premier Wade MacLauchlan, had won five. “Welcome to a new day in Prince Edward Island!” Progressive Conservative Leader Dennis King told supporters, who immediately roared their approval. “Welcome to a new era of Island politics. Welcome to the tremendous honour and the tremendous responsibility of governing.” Remarking on the strong showing by the Greens, King said it showed that Island voters want their political parties to work together. “It shows that Prince Edward Island wants the parties to put partisanship behind them … to do what’s best for Prince Edward Island,” he said. The Tories finished with 37 per cent of the popular vote, followed by the Greens at 31 per cent and the Liberals at 29 per cent. The NDP got just 3 per cent. The three-way race produced the province’s first minority government since 1890. The Greens had led in opinion polls since August, prompting speculation they could be poised to form Canada’s first Green government. Still, their strong showing on election night was a major breakthrough for a party that did not hold a seat in the legislature until 2015. That’s when party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker won in the general election - after nine unsuccessful runs for office on the Island and in Ontario. “Islanders responded (to us) by granting us a record number of seats - by far the most seats ever by a Green party in Canada,” he told a boisterous crowd at the PEI Brewing Company in Charlottetown. “I’m a strong believer in the capacity of minority government to create a collaborative environment where competing parties can put the interests of constituents and Islanders first.” King, a former political staffer and consultant, was elected to lead his party only two months ago. He won the riding of Brackley-Hunter River. The Tories enjoyed a boost in the polls last month, leaving them in a virtual dead heat with the Greens and Liberals as the campaign began. The Tory victory represents the latest in a series of gains for right-leaning parties, including wins in Alberta, Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario - all within the last year. Earlier this year, the Island’s Progressive Conservatives were largely regarded as a dysfunctional organization, having churned through no less than six leaders in the past eight years. Despite past infighting within Tory ranks, King was lauded for running a solid campaign, mainly by reinforcing a relentlessly positive message - a tried-and-true tactic among Island politicians. A former communications director for former Tory premier Pat Binns, King performed well on the hustings and in a series of decidedly polite leaders debates. However, the rookie leader’s run for office was marred by a mild controversy over a series of tweets that were supposed to be funny, but instead offended some, who criticized them for being sexist and homophobic. King, 47, who also describes himself as a comedian and story-teller with a progressive political outlook, admitted that some of the tweets were inappropriate. Among other things, King promised to expand beer and wine sales to convenience stores. Access to family doctors emerged as a key issue in the campaign. All four parties talked about recruiting more physicians. According to Health PEI, there are 13,083 Islanders on the waiting list for a family doctor  The Greens’ rise in popularity generated a national buzz during an otherwise lacklustre campaign. During the race, Bevan-Baker - a Scottish-born dentist - tried to persuade Islanders that the Greens care about more than just the environment, offering a platform that focused on a range of social issues. The 56-year-old Green leader, who was elected to the legislature as the first Green member in 2015, won his riding of New Haven-Rocky Point. The Liberals were seeking a fourth term in office, having repeatedly reminded Islanders that the province’s economy remains the strongest in the country. MacLauchlan, 64, failed to win his seat. “It’s simple: the tide turned. We’ve had four years of good government, responsible government and exceptionally good management of the province’s finances,” he told reporters. “We left no stone unturned. We presented good policy. We presented a good team and we went and did the work that candidates do.”  It wouldn’t be a stretch to say P.E.I. is on a tear, posting impressive numbers for higher wages, employment, immigration, housing starts, exports, retail sales and tourism. However, voters appeared reluctant to give MacLauchlan credit for boosting the economy, a sentiment that was reflected in his relatively low personal popularity ratings. The Island’s New Democrats, led by 57-year-old Joe Byrne, were not in contention in any ridings. When the legislature was dissolved, the Liberals held 16 seats in the 27-seat legislature, the Tories had eight and the Green party had two seats. There was one Independent. A total of 14 seats are needed for a majority, but only 26 of the 27 seats were contested Tuesday. On Saturday, Elections P.E.I. postponed the vote in the district of Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park following the deaths of Green party candidate, Josh Underhay, and his young son in a boating mishap on the Hillsborough River. A byelection will be held in the riding within the next three months. Aside from the election outcome, voters cast ballots in a referendum on electoral reform. Preliminary results suggested voters had declined to endorse the switch to proportional representation, though the results were close - and several polls had yet to be counted. Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

CP NewsAlert: Maple Leafs eliminated from NHL playoffs with Game 7 loss

2 hours 42 min ago
BOSTON - The Toronto Maple Leafs have been eliminated from the NHL playoffs. Toronto lost to the Boston Bruins 4-1 in Game 7 of their first-round series. With the Maple Leafs’ exit there are no Canadian teams left in the NHL’s post-season. More coming. The Canadian Press

CP NewsAlert: Toronto Raptors advance with Game 5 rout of Orlando Magic

2 hours 46 min ago
BOSTON - The Toronto Raptors are moving on in the NBA playoffs. Kawhi Leonard had 27 points as Toronto routed the Orlando Magic 115-96 in Game 5 of their first-round matchup. The Raptors won the best-of-seven series 4-1. More coming. The Canadian Press

Voters in Prince Edward Island elect Tory minority amid Green surge

3 hours 11 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - Voters in P.E.I. have shed their century-old embrace of the Island’s two-party system, electing a Tory minority government and handing the upstart Green party official Opposition status for the first time. With all polls reporting Tuesday, the Tories won 12 seats, the Greens held nine, and the incumbent Liberals, led by Premier Wade MacLauchlan, had won five. The Greens had led in opinion polls since August, prompting speculation they could be poised to form Canada’s first Green government. Still, their strong showing on election night proved to be a breakthrough for a party that did not hold a seat in the legislature until 2015. That’s when party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker won in the general election - after nine unsuccessful runs for office on the Island and in Ontario. “Islanders responded (to us) by granting us a record number of seats - by far the most seats ever by a Green party in Canada,” he told a boisterous crowd at the PEI Brewing Company in Charlottetown. “I’m a strong believer in the capacity of minority government to create a collaborative environment where competing parties can put the interests of constituents and Islanders first.” Progressive Conservative Leader Dennis King, a former political staffer and consultant, was elected to lead the party only two months ago. He won the riding of Brackley-Hunter River. The Tories enjoyed a boost in the polls last month, leaving them in a virtual dead heat with the Greens and Liberals as the campaign began. The Tory victory represents the latest in a series of gains for right-leaning parties, including wins in Alberta, Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario - all within the last year. Earlier this year, the Island’s Progressive Conservatives were largely regarded as a dysfunctional organization, having churned through no less than six leaders in the past eight years. Despite past infighting within Tory ranks, King was lauded for running a solid campaign, mainly by reinforcing a relentlessly positive message - a tried-and-true tactic among Island politicians. A former communications director for former Tory premier Pat Binns, King performed well on the hustings and in a series of decidedly polite leaders debates. However, the rookie leader’s run for office was marred by a mild controversy over a series of tweets that were supposed to be funny, but instead offended some, who criticized them for being sexist and homophobic. King, who also describes himself as a comedian and story-teller with a progressive political outlook, admitted that some of the tweets were inappropriate. Among other things, King promised to expand beer and wine sales to convenience stores. Access to family doctors emerged as a key issue in the campaign. All four parties talked about recruiting more physicians. According to Health PEI, there are 13,083 Islanders on the waiting list for a family doctor  The Greens’ rise in popularity generated a national buzz during an otherwise lacklustre campaign. During the race, Bevan-Baker - a Scottish-born dentist - tried to persuade Islanders that the Greens care about more than just the environment, offering a platform that focused on a range of social issues. The Green leader, who was elected to the legislature as the first Green member in 2015, won his riding of New Haven-Rocky Point. The Liberals were seeking a fourth term in office, having repeatedly reminded Islanders that the province’s economy remains the strongest in the country. MacLauchlan failed to win his seat. “It’s simple: the tide turned. We’ve had four years of good government, responsible government and exceptionally good management of the province’s finances,” he told reporters. “We left no stone unturned. We presented good policy. We presented a good team and we went and did the work that candidates do.”  It wouldn’t be a stretch to say P.E.I. is on a tear, posting impressive numbers for higher wages, employment, immigration, housing starts, exports, retail sales and tourism. However, voters appeared reluctant to give MacLauchlan credit for boosting the economy, a sentiment that was reflected in his relatively low personal popularity ratings. The Island’s New Democrats, led by 57-year-old Joe Byrne, were not in contention in any ridings. When the legislature was dissolved, the Liberals held 16 seats in the 27-seat legislature, the Tories had eight and the Green party had two seats. There was one Independent. A total of 14 seats are needed for a majority, but only 26 of the 27 seats were contested Tuesday. On Saturday, Elections P.E.I. postponed the vote in the district of Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park following the deaths of Green party candidate, Josh Underhay, and his young son in a boating mishap on the Hillsborough River. A byelection will be held in the riding within the next three months. Aside from the election outcome, voters will also learn the results of a binding referendum on electoral reform, which will determine if Islanders want to keep the first-past-the-post system or change to a mixed member proportional representation model. Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

Shallow quake shakes northeast India, no damage yet reported

3 hours 38 min ago
GAUHATI, India - A moderate earthquake shook remote northeastern India near the border with China early Wednesday, but no damage or casualties were immediately reported. U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Gavin Hayes said the area in Arunachal Pradesh state is sparsely populated so not many casualties or much damage was expected. The USGS said the quake was magnitude 5.9 with an epicenter 33 kilometres (20 miles) north-northwest of Along, India. It was a relatively shallow 14 kilometres (8.7 miles) below the surface. Hayes says this area of the Himalayan frontal thrust has had some large quakes in the distant past, making experts more alert to the possibility that a bigger one might be next. However, he says most earthquakes are not followed by larger ones. The Associated Press

QuickSketch: Dennis King, the apparent next premier of Prince Edward Island

3 hours 43 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - A look at Dennis King, leader of the P.E.I. Progressive Conservatives and the Island’s apparent next premier. Age: 47. Early years: Grew up in Georgetown, P.E.I. Education: Graduated from Montague Regional High School in 1990. Studied journalism in Ontario. Career: King worked for P.E.I. media outlets including the Eastern Graphic and the Guardian. He worked as a communications officer for the P.E.I. departments of Transportation and Development and Technology, and later served as director of communications to Premier Pat Binns. In 2007 he became director of communications and business development with the Mi’kmaq Confederacy of Prince Edward Island. In 2013, he started his own public relations and communications consulting business. Family: Married to Jana Hemphill. They have three children – Jacob, Camdyn and Callum. They operate Storybrook Stables, a horse farm in Brookfield, P.E.I. Quote: “Our job now is to come together for Islanders and offer a strong, viable, principled party for change in a political climate, ladies and gentlemen, that is ripe for change.” – After being chosen as party leader on Feb. 9, 2019. The Canadian Press

Voters in Prince Edward Island elect Tory minority government in tight race

3 hours 49 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - Voters in P.E.I. have shed their century-old embrace of the Island’s two-party system by electing a Tory minority government, bringing a dramatic conclusion to a tight electoral race that saw the upstart Green party secure a firm foothold in the legislature. Two hours after the polls closed Tuesday, the Tories were leading and elected in 12 ridings, the Greens were in second with nine and the incumbent Liberals, led by Premier Wade MacLauchlan, were in third with five. MacLauchlan failed to win his seat. “It’s something that happens in politics,” he told reporters. “The tide has changed.” The Greens had led in opinion polls since August, which prompted speculation they could be poised to form Canada’s first Green government. Progressive Conservative Leader Dennis King, a former political staffer and consultant, was elected to lead the party only two months ago. He won the riding of Brackley-Hunter River. The Tories enjoyed a boost in the polls last month, leaving them in a virtual dead heat with the Greens and Liberals as the campaign ended. The Tory victory represents the latest in a series of gains for right-leaning parties, including wins in Alberta, Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario - all within the last year. Earlier this year, the Island’s Progressive Conservatives were largely regarded as a dysfunctional organization, having churned through no less than six leaders in the past eight years. Despite past infighting within Tory ranks, King was lauded for running a solid campaign, mainly by reinforcing a relentlessly positive message. A former communications director for former Tory Premier Patt Binns, King performed well on the hustings and in a series of remarkably polite leaders debates. However, the rookie leader’s run for office was marred by a mild controversy over a series of tweets that were supposed to be funny, but instead offended some, who criticized them for being sexist and homophobic. King, who also describes himself as a comedian and story-teller with a progressive political outlook, admitted that some of the tweets were inappropriate. Among other things, King promised to expand beer and wine sales to convenience stores. Access to family doctors emerged as a key issue in the campaign. All four parties talked about recruiting more physicians. According to Health PEI, there are 13,083 Islanders on the waiting list for a family doctor  Led by Scottish-born dentist Peter Bevan-Baker, the Greens’ rise in popularity generated a national buzz during an otherwise lacklustre campaign. During the race, Bevan-Baker tried to persuade Islanders that the Greens care about more than just the environment, offering a platform that focused on a range of social issues. The Green leader, who was elected to the legislature as the first Green member in 2015, won his riding of New Haven-Rocky Point. The Liberals were seeking a fourth term in office, having repeatedly reminded Islanders that the province’s economy remains the strongest in the country. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say P.E.I. is on a tear, posting impressive numbers for higher wages, employment, immigration, housing starts, exports, retail sales and tourism. However, voters appeared reluctant to give MacLauchlan credit for boosting the economy, a sentiment that was reflected in his relatively low personal popularity ratings. The Island’s New Democrats, led by 57-year-old Joe Byrne, were not in contention in any ridings. When the legislature was dissolved, the Liberals held 16 seats in the 27-seat legislature, the Tories had eight and the Green party had two seats. There was one Independent. A total of 14 seats are needed for a majority, but only 26 of the 27 seats were contested Tuesday. On Saturday, Elections P.E.I. postponed the vote in the district of Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park following the deaths of Green party candidate, Josh Underhay, and his young son in a boating mishap on the Hillsborough River. A byelection will be held in the riding within the next three months. Aside from the election outcome, voters will also learn the results of a binding referendum on electoral reform, which will determine if Islanders want to keep the first-past-the-post system or change to a mixed member proportional representation model. Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

NewsAlert: Liberal Premier Wade MacLauchlan loses own district in P.E.I. vote

4 hours 10 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - P.E.I. Premier Wade MacLauchlan has lost his own district of Stanhope-Marshfield as his Liberals went down to defeat province-wide in Tuesday’s provincial election. The Tories hold a slim lead over the Greens, and the Island will have a minority government with the Liberals reduced to third place.  More to come… The Canadian Press

Voters in Prince Edward Island elect minority government amid tight race

4 hours 16 min ago
CHARLOTTETOWN - Voters in P.E.I. have shed their century-old embrace of the Island’s two-party system by electing a minority government, but the final outcome remained unclear amid a tight electoral race that saw the Tories holding a slim lead over the Greens. Less than two hours after the polls closed Tuesday, the Tories were leading and elected in 12 ridings, the Greens had pulled into second place with nine and the incumbent Liberals were in third with five. The Greens had led in opinion polls since August, which led to speculation they could be poised to upend the two-party tradition and form Canada’s first Green government. Progressive Conservative Leader Dennis King, a former political staffer and consultant, was elected to lead the party only two months ago. He won the riding of Brackley-Hunter River. The Tories enjoyed a boost in the polls last month, leaving them in a virtual dead heat with the Greens and Liberals as the campaign ended. Led by Scottish-born dentist Peter Bevan-Baker, the Greens’ rise in popularity generated a national buzz during an otherwise lacklustre campaign. During the race, Bevan-Baker tried to persuade Islanders that the Greens care about more than just the environment, offering a platform that focused on a range of social issues. The Green leader, who was elected to the legislature as the first Green member in 2015, won his riding of New Haven-Rocky Point. The Liberals, under Premier Wade MacLauchlan, were seeking a fourth term in office, having repeatedly reminded Islanders that the province’s economy remains the strongest in the country. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say P.E.I. is on a tear, posting impressive numbers for higher wages, employment, immigration, housing starts, exports, retail sales and tourism. However, voters appeared reluctant to give MacLauchlan credit for boosting the economy, a sentiment that was reflected in his relatively low personal popularity ratings. The Island’s New Democrats, led by 57-year-old Joe Byrne, were not in contention in any ridings. When the legislature was dissolved, the Liberals held 16 seats in the 27-seat legislature, the Tories had eight and the Green party had two seats. There was one Independent. A total of 14 seats are needed for a majority, but only 26 of the 27 seats will be contested. On Saturday, Elections P.E.I. postponed the vote in the district of Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park following the deaths of Green party candidate, Josh Underhay, and his young son in a boating mishap on the Hillsborough River. A byelection will be held in the riding within the next three months. Aside from the election outcome, voters will also learn the results of a binding referendum on electoral reform, which will determine if Islanders want to keep the first-past-the-post system or change to a mixed member proportional representation model. Kevin Bissett and Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

Pages