Saskatoon News

Jonathan Jennings working out with Ottawa Redblacks’ starting offence

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 32 min ago
OTTAWA - The Ottawa Redblacks had a new quarterback under centre Tuesday. A club official confirmed backup Jonathan Jennings was working with the club’s starting offence at practice and that incumbent Dominique Davis has an unspecified injury. Head coach Rick Campbell is expected to address the issue of whether Jennings or Davis will start Friday night when Ottawa visits the Winnipeg Blue Bombers (4-0) following practice. Ottawa (2-2) has dropped two straight games, including a 29-14 home decision to Winnipeg on July 5. Davis opened the season as Ottawa’s starter following the off-season departure of Trevor Harris to the Edmonton Eskimos. Davis boasts a 66-per-cent completion percentage but has more than twice as many interceptions (seven) as TD strikes (three). He has also rushed for 76 yards and five TDs on 15 carries. It was a mixed bag for Davis in Ottawa’s season-opening 32-28 road win over Calgary on June 15. He had four interceptions but also ran for three touchdowns. The Canadian Press

$1.5 billion in frigate repair contracts split between yards in three provinces

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 41 min ago
OTTAWA - The federal government is awarding $1 billion in warship maintenance work to two Canadian shipyards, with a third deal on the way. The five-year contracts announced Tuesday award $500 million in work to Chantier Davie shipyard in Quebec and Seaspan Victoria Shipyards in British Columbia. A similar deal with Irving Shipyards in Nova Scotia is on the way, the government says. The contracts are part of a $7.5-billion plan to maintain Canada’s 12 Halifax-class frigates for the rest of their operational lives, which are expected to last about another 20 years. The ships are 27 years old and will eventually be replaced by new warships built under the national shipbuilding strategy. Cabinet ministers Jean-Yves Duclos and Carla Qualtrough in Victoria revealed the details of the contracts in two simultaneous announcements Tuesday. The Canadian Press

Airline confirms three dead after float plane crashes in Labrador lake

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 45 min ago
ST. JOHN’S, N.L. - A search is underway for four people missing after a float plane crashed into a Labrador lake on Monday, killing three of the occupants. Jean Tremblay, president of the small Quebec airline that owns the plane, said he was informed by search and rescue officials that three of those aboard were killed, while the condition of the other four people remains unknown. Tremblay, president of Air Saguenay, said the de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver was carrying four fishermen, two guides and the pilot. It left Three Rivers Lodge on Crossroads Lake, east of Schefferville, Que., Monday morning headed to a remote fishing camp on Mistastin Lake. The plane didn’t return as planned that evening. “After one hour, the plane was still missing, and there was no news, so we engaged the emergency plan,” Tremblay said. The pilot is an employee of Air Saguenay. “Our pilot has been employed with us since 2011, he’s 61 years old with more than 20,000 hours (flying experience),” Tremblay said. “He has been assigned to this specific contract with the outfitter for many years.” A Hercules aircraft spotted the wreckage at about 5 a.m. local time Tuesday on Mistastin Lake, about 120 kilometres southwest of Nain, N.L. “The plane was submerged and about a mile from the shore,” Tremblay said. He said the plane had been in good working order. “There was an inspection this spring, and there were many hours (of flight) left before it was due for another inspection,” he said. Tremblay noted the weather conditions were good on Monday. “The Labrador coast has a bit of micro-climate, I would say, but as far as we know, the conditions were excellent everywhere.” Maj. Mark Gough of Maritime Forces Atlantic said military rescuers are searching for survivors at the crash site. Rescue officials said a helicopter was expected to arrive at the site Tuesday morning, and a second float plane had been dispatched to assist in search efforts. The Canadian Transport Safety Board will investigate the crash. The Canadian Press

Anxious immigrants wait to learn effect of new asylum policy

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 46 min ago
Dozens of immigrants lined up Tuesday at a major Mexico border crossing, waiting to learn how the Trump administration’s plans to end most asylum protections would affect their hopes of taking refuge in the United States. The administration announced the plans a day earlier, reversing decades of U.S. policy in its most forceful attempt yet to slash the number of people seeking asylum in America. The new rule would cover countless would-be refugees, many of them fleeing violence and poverty in Central America. It is certain to face legal challenges. Derek Mbi of Cameroon was among several dozen migrants who gathered in Tijuana, where he waited to hear how many people, if any, the U.S. would allow in for processing. He arrived in Tijuana about a month ago, and there are more than 8,100 people ahead of him on the waiting list. Processing new arrivals has ground to a virtual halt to in recent days, down from an average of about 40 names a day. Mbi, 29, joined a wave of Cameroonians who fled fierce government oppression against their country’s English-speaking minority by flying to Ecuador, which does not require a visa. From there, he travelled for months by bus and on foot through seven other countries to reach Tijuana. Mbi learned about the new policy but mistakenly believed that it applied only to Central and South Americans. “When I got to Ecuador, I had a language barrier, said Mbi, who hopes to settle with a friend in Texas. “If I can go to the United States or Canada, I will go.” For now he is sharing a one-bedroom apartment with 13 Cameroonians in Tijuana and scraping by with odd jobs, like peeling tomatoes at open-air markets. He said many companies refused to hire him because his short-term transit permit in Mexico does not allow him to work. Mbi declined to discuss why he fled Cameroon. According to the plan published in the Federal Register , migrants who pass through another country - in this case, Mexico - on their way to the U.S. will be ineligible for asylum. The rule also applies to children who have crossed the border alone. The vast majority of people affected by the rule are from Central America. But sometimes migrants from Africa , Cuba or Haiti and other countries try to come through the U.S.-Mexico border, as well. There are some exceptions, including for victims of human trafficking and asylum-seekers who were denied protection in another country. If the country the migrant passed through did not sign one of the major international treaties governing how refugees are managed (though most Western countries signed them) a migrant could still apply for U.S. asylum. Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said Monday that his country “does not agree with any measure that limits access to asylum.” Mexico’s asylum system is also currently overwhelmed. Trump administration officials say the changes are meant to close the gap between the initial asylum screening that most people pass and the final decision on asylum, which most people are denied. Attorney General William Barr said that the United States is “a generous country but is being completely overwhelmed” by the burdens associated with apprehending and processing hundreds of thousands of migrants at the southern border. He also said the rule is aimed at “economic migrants” and “those who seek to exploit our asylum system to obtain entry to the United States.” But immigrant rights groups, religious leaders and humanitarian groups have said the administration’s policies amount to a cruel effort to keep immigrants out of the country. Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are poor countries, often wracked by violence. “This is yet another move to turn refugees with well-founded fears of persecution back to places where their lives are in danger. In fact, the rule would deny asylum to refugees who do not apply for asylum in countries where they are in peril,” said Eleanor Acer of Human Rights First. ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt, who has litigated some of the major challenges to the Trump administration’s immigration policies, said the rule was unlawful and the group planned to sue. “The rule, if upheld, would effectively eliminate asylum for those at the southern border,” he said. “But it is patently unlawful.” The new rule also will apply to the initial asylum screening, known as a “credible fear” interview, at which migrants must prove they have credible fears of returning to their home country. It applies to migrants who are arriving to the U.S., not those who are already in the country. Along with the administration’s recent effort to send asylum seekers back over the border , Trump has tried to deny asylum to anyone crossing the border illegally and restrict who can claim asylum. The attorney general recently tried to keep thousands of asylum seekers detained while their cases play out. Nearly all of those efforts have been blocked by courts. Tens of thousands of Central American migrant families cross the border each month, many claiming asylum. Border facilities have been dangerously cramped and crowded well beyond capacity. The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog found fetid, filthy conditions for many children. And lawmakers who travelled there recently decried conditions . ___ Spagat reported from Tijuana, Mexico. Associated Press writers Cedar Attanasio in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Colleen Long and Michael Balsamo in Washington contributed to this report. Elliot Spagat, The Associated Press

Anxious immigrants wait to learn effect of new asylum policy

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 51 min ago
Dozens of immigrants are lining up at a Mexico border crossing, waiting to learn how the Trump administration’s plans to end most asylum protections will affect them. The plans announced Monday reverse decades of U.S. policy. It is the administration’s most forceful attempt yet to slash the number of people seeking asylum in America. The new rule would cover countless would-be refugees, many of them fleeing violence and poverty in Central America. Derek Mbi of Cameroon was among several dozen migrants who gathered in Tijuana. He waited to hear how many people, if any, the U.S. would allow in for processing. Thousands of people are ahead of him on the waiting list. Mbi learned about the new policy but mistakenly believed that it applied only to Central and South Americans. Elliot Spagat, The Associated Press

Arbitrator upholds CFL’s suspension against Ticats’ linebacker Lawrence

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 59 min ago
TORONTO - The Hamilton Tiger-Cats will be without linebacker Simoni Lawrence for two games. An arbitrator ruled Tuesday in favour of the CFL’s original suspension, a week after Lawrence met with the arbitrator after appealing the ban the CFL levied against him last month. The decision was somewhat surprising. The expectation was the suspension would be reduced to just one game shortly after the CFL Players’ Association announced it was grieving the original ban on Lawrence’s behalf. The CFL suspended Lawrence for two games after he hit quarterback Zach Collaros in the head during Hamilton's season-opening 23-17 home win over Saskatchewan on June 13. Lawrence received a 25-yard roughing-the-passer penalty on the play. Collaros didn’t return to the contest and went on the six-game injured list shortly afterwards. A repentant Lawrence said he didn’t mean to hurt his former teammate, and the CFLPA’s grievance of the suspension June 19 allowed Lawrence to continue playing until the arbitrator’s decision came down. The six-foot-one, 231-pound Lawrence is in his eighth CFL season, seventh with Hamilton. He’s fifth overall in tackles with a team-high 23 as well as three sacks and two interceptions in five games with the Ticats, who are atop the East Division standings with a 4-1 record. Hamilton is currently on a bye week. As a result of the arbitrator’s decision, Lawrence will miss the Ticats’ home game July 26 against Winnipeg and their Aug. 1 road contest versus Saskatchewan. Lawrence will be eligible to return to the Ticats’ lineup Aug. 10 when they host the B.C. Lions at Tim Hortons Field. The Canadian Press

Apollo 11 astronaut returns to launch pad 50 years later

News Talk 650 CKOM - 1 hour 59 min ago
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins returned Tuesday to the exact spot where he flew to the moon 50 years ago with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Collins had the spotlight to himself this time - Armstrong has been gone for seven years and Aldrin cancelled. Collins said he wished his two moonwalking colleagues could have shared the moment at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A, the departure point for humanity’s first moon landing. “Wonderful feeling to be back,” the 88-year-old command module pilot said on NASA TV. “There’s a difference this time. I want to turn and ask Neil a question and maybe tell Buzz Aldrin something, and of course, I’m here by myself.” At NASA’s invitation, Collins marked the precise moment - 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969 - that the Saturn V rocket blasted off. He was seated at the base of the pad alongside Kennedy’s director, Robert Cabana, a former space shuttle commander. Collins recalled the tension surrounding the crew that day. “Apollo 11 … was serious business. We, crew, felt the weight of the world on our shoulders. We knew that everyone would be looking at us, friend or foe, and we wanted to do the best we possibly could,” he said. Collins remained in lunar orbit, tending to Columbia, the mother ship, while Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the Eagle on July 20, 1969, and spent 2 1/2 hours walking the gray, dusty lunar surface. A reunion Tuesday at the Kennedy firing room by past and present launch controllers - and Collins’ return to the pad, now leased to SpaceX - kicked off a week of celebrations marking each day of Apollo 11’s eight-day voyage. At the Air and Space Museum in Washington, the spacesuit that Armstrong wore went back on display in mint condition, complete with lunar dust left on the suit’s knees, thighs and elbows. On hand for the unveiling were Vice-President Mike Pence, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Armstrong’s older son, Rick. Armstrong died in 2012. A fundraising campaign took just five days to raise the $500,000 needed for the restoration. Calling Armstrong a hero, Pence said “the American people express their gratitude by preserving this symbol of courage.” In Huntsville, Alabama, where the Saturn V was developed, thousands of model rockets were launched simultaneously, commemorating the moment the Apollo 11 crew blasted off for the moon. Hundreds of youngsters attending Space Camp counted down … “5, 4, 3, 2, 1!” - and cheered as the rockets created a gray cloud, at least for a few moments, in the sky. Back at Kennedy, NASA televised original launch video of Apollo 11, timed down to the second. Then Cabana turned the conversation to NASA’s next moonshot program, Artemis, named after the twin sister of Greek mythology’s Apollo. It seeks to put the first woman and next man on the lunar surface - the moon’s south pole - by 2024. President John F. Kennedy’s challenge to put a man on the moon by the end of 1969 took eight years to achieve. Collins said he likes the name Artemis and, even more, likes the concept behind Artemis. “But I don’t want to go back to the moon,” Collins told Cabana. “I want to go direct to Mars. I call it the JFK Mars Express.” Collins noted that the moon-first crowd has merit to its argument and he pointed out Armstrong himself was among those who believed returning to the moon “would assist us mightily in our attempt to go to Mars.” Cabana assured Collins, “We believe the faster we get to the moon, the faster we get to Mars as we develop those systems that we need to make that happen.” About 100 of the original 500 launch controllers and managers on July 16, 1969, reunited in the firing room Tuesday morning. The crowd also included members of NASA’s next moon management team, including Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, launch director for the still-in-development Space Launch System moon rocket. The SLS will surpass the Saturn V, the world’s most powerful rocket to fly to date. Blackwell-Thompson said she got goosebumps listening to the replay of the Apollo 11 countdown. Hearing Collins’ “personal account of what that was like was absolutely amazing.” The lone female launch controller for Apollo 11, JoAnn Morgan, enjoyed seeing the much updated- firing room. One thing was notably missing, though: stacks of paper. “We could have walked to the moon on the paper,” Morgan said. Collins was going to be reunited later in the day with two other Apollo astronauts at an evening gala at Kennedy, including Apollo 16 moonwalker Charlie Duke, who was the capsule communicator in Mission Control for the Apollo 11 moon landing. The U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville also had a special anniversary dinner on tap Tuesday night, with Aldrin and other retired Apollo astronauts and rocket scientists. Only four of the 12 moonwalkers from 1969 through 1972 are still alive: Aldrin, Duke, Apollo 15’s David Scott and Apollo 17’s Harrison Schmitt. NASA spokesman Bob Jacobs said Aldrin, 89, bowed out of the launch pad visit, citing his intense schedule of appearances. Aldrin hosted a gala in Southern California last Saturday and planned to head directly to the Huntsville dinner. Aldrin and Collins may reunite in Washington on Friday or Saturday, the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s moon landing. ___ Science writer Seth Borenstein contributed from Washington. ___ Follow AP’s full coverage of the Apollo 11 anniversary at:https://apnews.com/Apollo11moonlanding ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content. Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

Edmonton Oilers sign forward Josh Archibald to one-year contract

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 4 min ago
EDMONTON - The Edmonton Oilers have signed free agent forward Josh Archibald to a one-year contract. The 26-yea-old Archibald spent last season with the Arizona Coyotes, recording 22 points (12 goals, 10 assists) in 68 games. The five-foot-10, 176-pound forward has 36 points (20 goals, 16 assists) in 121 career NHL games with Pittsburgh and Arizona. He was part of the Penguins’ 2016-17 team that won a Stanley Cup. Archibald, a native of Brainerd, Minn., was selected by Pittsburgh in the sixth round, 174th overall, at the 2011 NHL draft. The Canadian Press

Anxious immigrants wait to learn effect of new asylum policy

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 10 min ago
Dozens of immigrants lined up Tuesday at a major Mexico border crossing, waiting to learn how the Trump administration’s plans to end most asylum protections would affect their hopes of taking refuge in the United States. The administration announced the plans a day earlier, reversing decades of U.S. policy in its most forceful attempt yet to slash the number of people seeking asylum in America. The new rule would cover countless would-be refugees, many of them fleeing violence and poverty in Central America. It is certain to face legal challenges. Derek Mbi of Cameroon was among several dozen migrants who gathered in Tijuana, where he waited to hear how many people, if any, the U.S. would allow in for processing. He arrived in Tijuana about a month ago, and there are more than 8,100 people ahead of him on the waiting list. Processing new arrivals has ground to a virtual halt to in recent days, down from an average of about 40 names a day. Mbi, 29, joined a wave of Cameroonians who fled fierce government oppression against their country’s English-speaking minority by flying to Ecuador, which does not require a visa. From there, he travelled for months by bus and on foot through seven other countries to reach Tijuana. Mbi learned about the new policy but mistakenly believed that it applied only to Central and South Americans. “When I got to Ecuador, I had a language barrier, said Mbi, who hopes to settle with a friend in Texas. “If I can go to the United States or Canada, I will go.” For now he is sharing a one-bedroom apartment with 13 Cameroonians in Tijuana and scraping by with odd jobs, like peeling tomatoes at open-air markets. He said many companies refused to hire him because his short-term transit permit in Mexico does not allow him to work. Mbi declined to discuss why he fled Cameroon. According to the plan published in the Federal Register , migrants who pass through another country - in this case, Mexico - on their way to the U.S. will be ineligible for asylum. The rule also applies to children who have crossed the border alone. The vast majority of people affected by the rule are from Central America. But sometimes migrants from Africa , Cuba or Haiti and other countries try to come through the U.S.-Mexico border, as well. There are some exceptions, including for victims of human trafficking and asylum-seekers who were denied protection in another country. If the country the migrant passed through did not sign one of the major international treaties governing how refugees are managed (though most Western countries signed them) a migrant could still apply for U.S. asylum. Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said Monday that his country “does not agree with any measure that limits access to asylum.” Mexico’s asylum system is also currently overwhelmed. Trump administration officials say the changes are meant to close the gap between the initial asylum screening that most people pass and the final decision on asylum, which most people are denied. Attorney General William Barr said that the United States is “a generous country but is being completely overwhelmed” by the burdens associated with apprehending and processing hundreds of thousands of migrants at the southern border. He also said the rule is aimed at “economic migrants” and “those who seek to exploit our asylum system to obtain entry to the United States.” But immigrant rights groups, religious leaders and humanitarian groups have said the administration’s policies amount to a cruel effort to keep immigrants out of the country. Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are poor countries, often wracked by violence. “This is yet another move to turn refugees with well-founded fears of persecution back to places where their lives are in danger. In fact, the rule would deny asylum to refugees who do not apply for asylum in countries where they are in peril,” said Eleanor Acer of Human Rights First. ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt, who has litigated some of the major challenges to the Trump administration’s immigration policies, said the rule was unlawful and the group planned to sue. “The rule, if upheld, would effectively eliminate asylum for those at the southern border,” he said. “But it is patently unlawful.” The new rule also will apply to the initial asylum screening, known as a “credible fear” interview, at which migrants must prove they have credible fears of returning to their home country. It applies to migrants who are arriving to the U.S., not those who are already in the country. Along with the administration’s recent effort to send asylum seekers back over the border , Trump has tried to deny asylum to anyone crossing the border illegally and restrict who can claim asylum. The attorney general recently tried to keep thousands of asylum seekers detained while their cases play out. Nearly all of those efforts have been blocked by courts. Tens of thousands of Central American migrant families cross the border each month, many claiming asylum. Border facilities have been dangerously cramped and crowded well beyond capacity. The Department of Homeland Security’s watchdog found fetid, filthy conditions for many children. And lawmakers who travelled there recently decried conditions . ___ Spagat reported from Tijuana, Mexico. Associated Press writers Cedar Attanasio in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Colleen Long and Michael Balsamo in Washington contributed to this report. Elliot Spagat, The Associated Press

Caregiver benefit for parents of ill children misunderstood, federal review says

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 11 min ago
OTTAWA - An evaluation of a federal benefit to help parents take time off work to care for critically ill children says fewer people have used it than expected because they didn’t know about it or didn’t understand how it worked. Annual applications for the benefit have been well below the 6,000 anticipated when the previous Conservative government introduced it in 2013. The evaluation posted online details months-late applications, call-centre agents who didn’t always understand all facets of the benefit themselves, and rejected applicants who tended to have lower levels of education and earnings. The Liberals morphed the benefit into a new program designed to be easier to apply for and receive. Employment and Social Development Canada, which oversees the program, says there were 4,900 claims for the new benefit between its introduction in December 2017 and December 2018. The department has also worked since November 2017 to improve understanding of the new benefit through social-media posts, online videos and rewriting a federal website. The Canadian Press

Facing censure, Trump insists ‘not a racist bone in my body’

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 24 min ago
WASHINGTON - Defiant in the face of widespread censure, President Donald Trump insisted Tuesday that his tweets suggesting four Democratic congresswomen of colour return to their countries “were NOT Racist,” and he appealed to fellow Republicans to “not show weakness” and to resist a House resolution condemning his words. “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” Trump exclaimed on Twitter, a day after declaring that “many people agree” with his assessment of the four freshman lawmakers. “Those Tweets were NOT Racist,” Trump wrote Tuesday amid a continued backlash to his weekend tweets that progressive women “go back” to their “broken and crime-infested” countries. The tweets, which have been widely denounced as racist, were directed at Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. All are American citizens, and three of the four were born in the U.S. Trump alleged again Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality “hate our Country.” The four lawmakers fired back late Monday, condemning what they called “xenophobic bigoted remarks” and renewing calls for Democrats to begin impeachment proceedings. The episode served notice that Trump is willing to again rely on incendiary rhetoric on issues of race and immigration to preserve his political base in the leadup to the 2020 election. He shrugged off the criticism. “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me,” Trump said Monday at the White House. “A lot of people love it, by the way.” At the Capitol, there was near unanimous condemnation from Democrats and a rumble of discontent from a subset of Republicans, but notably not from the party’s congressional leaders. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who said Trump’s campaign slogan truly means he wants to “make America white again,” announced Monday that the House would vote on a resolution condemning his new comments . The resolution “strongly condemns” Trump’s “racist comments” and says they “have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of colour.” In response, Trump tweeted anew Tuesday about the four congresswomen: “Why isn’t the House voting to rebuke the filthy and hate laced things they have said? Because they are the Radical Left, and the Democrats are afraid to take them on. Sad!” Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah, the party’s White House nominee in 2012 and now one of the president’s most vocal GOP critics, said Monday that Trump’s comments were “destructive, demeaning, and disunifying.” Trump dug in. “If you’re not happy in the U.S., if you’re complaining all the time, you can leave, you can leave right now,” he said. His words, which evoked the trope of telling black people to go back to Africa, may have been partly meant to widen the divides within the House Democratic caucus, which has been riven by internal debate over how best to oppose his policies. And while Trump’s attacks brought Democrats together in defence of their colleagues, his allies noted he was also having some success in making the progressive lawmakers the face of their party. The Republican president questioned whether Democrats should “want to wrap” themselves around this group of four people as he recited a list of the quartet’s most controversial statements. “Nancy Pelosi tried to push them away, but now they are forever wedded to the Democrat Party,” he wrote Tuesday, adding: “See you in 2020!” At a news conference with her three colleagues, Pressley referred to Trump as “the occupant of our White House” instead of president. “He does not embody the grace, the empathy, the compassion, the integrity that that office requires and that the American people deserve,” she said, encouraging people “not take the bait.” Pressley said Trump’s comments were “a disruptive distraction from the issues of care, concern and consequence to the American people” - prescription drug prices, affordable housing, health care.” Omar, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Somalia, accused him of “openly violating” the Constitution and sounded the call for impeachment proceedings. Ocasio-Cortez said Trump “does not know how to defend his policies and so what he does is attack us personally.” The Senate’s top Democrat, Chuck Schumer of New York, said his party would also try to force a vote in the GOP-controlled chamber. Trump, who won the presidency in 2016 in part by energizing disaffected voters with inflammatory racial rhetoric, made clear he has no intention of backing away from that strategy in 2020. “The Dems were trying to distance themselves from the four ‘progressives,’ but now they are forced to embrace them,” he tweeted Monday afternoon. “That means they are endorsing Socialism, hate of Israel and the USA! Not good for the Democrats!” Trump has faced few consequences for such attacks in the past. They typically earn him cycles of wall-to-wall media attention and little blowback from his party. He is wagering that his most steadfast supporters will be energized by the controversy as much, or if not more so, than the opposition. The president has told aides that he was giving voice to what many of his supporters believe - that they are tired of people, including immigrants, disrespecting their country, according to three Republicans close to the White House who were not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations. Trump singled out Omar, in particular, accusing her of having “hatred” for Israel and expressing “love” for “enemies like al-Qaida.” “These are people that, in my opinion, hate our country,” he said. Sen. Lindsey Graham, a close ally of the president who golfed with him over the weekend, advised him to “aim higher” during an appearance on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” even as he accused the four Democrats of being “anti-Semitic” and “anti-American.” Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice-President Mike Pence, said “I don’t think that the president’s intent in any way is racist,” pointing to Trump’s decision to choose Elaine Chao, who was born in Taiwan, as his transportation secretary. Chao is one of the few minorities among the largely white and male aides in high-profile roles in Trump’s administration. She is the wife of Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who declined comment Monday on Trump’s attacks. Among the few GOP lawmakers commenting Monday, Rep. Pete Olson of Texas said Trump’s tweets were “not reflective of the values of the 1,000,000+ people” in his district. “I urge our President immediately disavow his comments,” he wrote. In an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll from February 2017, half of Americans said the mixing of culture and values from around the world is an important part of America’s identity as a nation. About a third said the same of a culture established by early European immigrants. But partisans in that poll were divided over these aspects of America’s identity. About two-thirds of Democrats but only about a third of Republicans thought the mixing of world cultures was important to the country’s identity. By comparison, nearly half of Republicans but just about a quarter of Democrats saw the culture of early European immigrants as important to the nation. ___ Associated Press writer Hannah Fingerhut contributed to this report. ___ Lemire reported from New York. Follow Miller on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@ZekeJMiller , Colvin at http://twitter.com/@ColvinJ and Lemire at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire . Zeke Miller, Jill Colvin, And Jonathan Lemire, The Associated Press

Retail rivals crash Amazon’s Prime Day party

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 25 min ago
NEW YORK - The gravitational pull of Amazon Prime Day is so strong on shoppers it’s benefiting other retailers as well, according to an early analysis from a key data group. On Monday, the first day of its 48-hour sales event, large retailers, those that generated annual revenue of at least a billion dollars, enjoyed a 64% increase in online sales compared with an average Monday, according to Adobe Analytics, which measures 80 of the top 100 retailers on the web in the U.S. That compares to last year’s 54%. In addition, niche retailers, those with annual revenue of less than $5 million, had a 30% increase in online sales. Amazon’s fifth annual Prime Day, which this year began Monday afternoon, was created to drum up sales during sluggish summer months and sign up more users for the company’s membership program. Other retailers have introduced sales to compete against Prime Day. Walmart has a “summer savings event” through Wednesday. Best Buy, eBay, Target and other retailers are also offering discounts. The Seattle e-commerce behemoth said it was offering more than a million deals. Amazon’s own products, like its Fire tablets and Echo smart speakers, are usually among the strongest sellers. The events have also helped to encourage shoppers to make back-to-school shopping purchases ahead of that season. This year, some used the high-profile event as a way to garner attention for their protests against Amazon. At a warehouse in Shakopee, Minnesota, Amazon workers staged a protest Monday to raise awareness of what they say are unfair working conditions. A group of tech workers in Seattle, called Amazon Employees for Climate Justice, is supporting the strike. Amazon said late last night that roughly 15 workers participated in the event outside of the Shakopee fulfilmentcentre. On Twitter, Massachusetts Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren voiced her support for the workers as well. Amazon says it already offers what the workers are asking for. “We provide great employment opportunities with excellent pay - ranging from $16.25-$20.80 an hour, and comprehensive benefits including health care, up to 20 weeks parental leave, paid education, promotional opportunities, and more,” spokeswoman Brenda Alfred said. The company has faced labour unrest before in Shakopee and in Europe . In New York, a coalition of labour groups planned to deliver 250,000 petitions to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ Manhattan home calling on the company to cut business ties with ICE and end abusive working conditions in its warehouses. And some on Twitter called for a blanket boycott of Amazon during Prime Day. San Diego State University Marketing Professor Steven Osinski said the protests were unlikely to have an effect on sales, however. “Americans liking discounts will trump worrying about higher wages for two days,” he said. The company counts more than 100 million subscribers to its Prime loyalty program, which costs $119 a year and provides free two-day shipping, free streaming movies, TV shows, music and other perks. Mae Anderson And Anne D’Innocenzio, The Associated Press

Boeing jet trouble leads to cuts at Europe’s busiest airline

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 26 min ago
LONDON - Europe’s biggest airline, budget carrier Ryanair, will cut flights and close some of its bases beginning this winter because of the delay to deliveries of the Boeing 737 Max plane, which has been grounded globally after two fatal crashes. The airline also warned Tuesday that its growth in European summer traffic for 2020 will be lower than expected because of the slowed deliveries. Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary said the airline “remains committed” to the Boeing 737 Max and expects it to be back in service before the end of the year but that the date is uncertain. Ryanair, which is Europe’s top airline by passengers, says some delays are expected and doubts about when the plane can return to the skies means it will take delivery of only 30 Max jets a year from now, rather than the previously scheduled 58. He says the airline will close some of its bases as a result with a hope to return to “normal” growth levels in 2021. No details about the planned base cuts were provided. Analysts at market research firm FXPro note that while Europe’s economy is slowing, there is no lack of demand for flying, so Ryanair’s decision could cause flight tickets to rise somewhat. Boeing’s 737 Max has been grounded after the Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia in October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash in March that killed a total of 346 people. Preliminary reports indicate that flight-control software called MCAS pushed the nose of the plane down in both crashes. Chicago-based Boeing did not tell pilots about MCAS until after the first crash. The company is working on changes to make the software more reliable and easier to control. Concerns about viability of the new aircraft remains, however. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is due to review Boeing’s fixes and has said it is following a thorough process, but has no timetable for when the recertification will be completed. European regulators have to then also approve the jets before they can be used in the region. American Airlines said this week that it will keep the Boeing 737 Max plane off its schedule until Nov. 3, which is two months longer than it had planned. That will result in the cancellation of about 115 flights per day. United Airlines has also extended its cancellations until Nov. 3. The company has 14 Max jets while American has 24 of them. Southwest Airlines, which has 34 Max jets - more than any other carrier - is cancelling about 150 flights per day. Gregory Katz, The Associated Press

Brandon Banks, Vernon Adams Jr. and Andrew Harris named CFL top performers

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 40 min ago
TORONTO - Hamilton receiver Brandon Banks, Montreal quarterback Vernon Adams Jr. and Winnipeg running back Andrew Harris are the CFL top performers for Week 5. Banks recorded nine receptions for 86 yards and two touchdowns, and returned a missed field goal 115-yards for another TD, in the Tiger-Cats’ 30-23 win over visiting Calgary on Saturday. Adams had a career-high 327 passing yards and scored four touchdowns (two passing, two rushing) in the Alouettes’ 36-19 road win over Ottawa on Saturday. Harris, a Winnipeg native, collected 123 all-purpose yards and scored a touchdown to help the undefeated Blue Bombers down visiting Toronto 48-21 on Friday. The Canadian Press

U.S. residents visiting B.C. help save drowning man in North Vancouver

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 41 min ago
VANCOUVER - Several Good Samaritans from the United States have saved a man from drowning in British Columbia. Brian Laverentz, a medical student from San Antonio, Texas, says he and his wife were honeymooning in the Vancouver area and were visiting Twin Falls on when they spotted a man in trouble in the frigid water. Laverentz says he has a long history of emergency medicine but didn’t think he could safely pull the man from the swollen river, when another man leaped in to grab the unconscious victim. The second man turned out to be a lifeguard visiting with his family from Chicago and Laverentz says they hauled the 24-year-old man to the shore and began performing chest compressions. The Chicago man’s daughter, a competitive swimmer, also assisted with the rescue and CPR, and they managed to revive the victim by the time first responders arrived. North Vancouver assistant fire chief Jeremy Duncan says without the bystanders, the outcome would have been very different and he wishes the Chicago family had left their contact information so they could be thanked. Laverentz says the man is lucky that a group of strangers with specific skills was nearby at the right time. “I just thought it was also serendipitous that we had a lifeguard father, a competitive swimmer daughter, who also knew CPR, me (with) about 10 years of emergency medicine experience, my wife who has lived around people in the medical field forever and helped direct a bunch of people,” says Laverentz. “I don’t know if he could have had any better luck as far as having a team of strangers.” The victim was taken to hospital for further treatment, but Laverentz says the man was talking and able to give them his name by the time park rangers had arrived. (News1130) The Canadian Press

Airline confirms three dead after float plane crashes in Labrador lake

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 42 min ago
ST. JOHN’S, N.L. - The president of a small Quebec airline says three people were killed when one of its planes crashed into a Labrador lake Monday. Jean Tremblay, president of Air Saguenay, said the float plane was carrying four fishermen, two guides and the pilot. He said the condition of the four missing occupants is unknown. Maj. Mark Gough of Maritime Forces Atlantic said military rescuers are searching for survivors at the crash site in Mistastin Lake, about 120 kilometres southwest of Nain, N.L. Gough said a Hercules aircraft spotted the wreckage of the de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver float plane at 5 a.m. local time Tuesday. He said the plane left a fishing lodge on Crossroads Lake, east of Schefferville, Que., Monday headed to a remote fishing camp on Mistastin Lake. It failed to return to the lodge that evening, and people at the lodge were unable to reach the missing party by satellite phone. Rescue officials said a helicopter was expected to arrive at the site Tuesday morning, and a second float plane had been dispatched to assist in search efforts. The Canadian Transport Safety Board will investigate the crash.       The Canadian Press

Police officer in ‘I can’t breathe’ death won’t be charged

News Talk 650 CKOM - 2 hours 49 min ago
NEW YORK - Federal prosecutors won’t bring civil rights charges against a New York City police officer in the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner, a decision made by Attorney General William Barr and announced one day before the five-year anniversary of his death, officials said. The announcement of the decision not to bring charges against Officer Daniel Pantaleo comes a day before the statute of limitations was set to expire in the case that produced the words “I can’t breathe” - among Garner’s final words - as a rallying cry among protesters of the police treatment of black suspects. “The evidence here does not support Officer Daniel Pantaleo or any other officer with a federal civil rights violation,” said Richard Donoghue, the U.S. attorney for eastern New York. “Even if we could prove that Officer Pantaleo’s hold of Mr. Garner constituted unreasonable force, we would still have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Officer Pantaleo acted willfully in violation of the law.” Gwen Carr, Garner’s mother, and the Rev. Al Sharpton said they were outraged and heartbroken. Sharpton called for Pantaleo’s dismissal from the NYPD. “We are here with heavy hearts, because the DOJ has failed us,” said Carr, who has become a vocal advocate of police reform in the years since her son’s death. “Five years ago, my son said “I can’t breathe” 11 times. Today, we can’t breathe.” A senior Justice Department official told The Associated Press that prosecutors watched video of the confrontation “countless” times but weren’t convinced Pantaleo acted wilfully in the seconds after the chokehold was applied. There were two sets of recommendations made. The Eastern District of New York recommended no charges, but Justice Department civil rights prosecutors in Washington recommended charging the officer. Attorney General William Barr made the ultimate decision, the official said. The official said Barr watched the video himself and got several briefings. Prosecutors had to examine Pantaleo’s state of mind, and it would be a “high standard” to prove the case to a jury, the official said. Prosecutors also considered whether he violated NYPD’s policy on chokeholds. Officers were attempting to arrest Garner on charges he sold loose, untaxed cigarettes outside a Staten Island convenience store. He refused to be handcuffed, and officers took him down. Garner is heard on bystander video crying out “I can’t breathe” at least 11 times before he falls unconscious. He later died. “I can’t breathe” became a rallying cry for police reform activists, coming amid a stretch of other deaths of black men at the hands of white officers. Garner was black; Pantaleo is white. Protests erupted around the country, and police reform became a national discussion. A state grand jury had also refused to indict the officer on criminal charges. In the years since Garner’s death, the New York Police Department made a series of sweeping changes on how it relates to the communities it serves, ditching a policy of putting rookie cops in higher-crime precincts in favour of a neighbourhood policing model that revolves around community officers tasked with getting to know New Yorkers. Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is running for president in part on the notion he helped improve police-community relations, said in a statement that the city is not the same as it was five years ago. “Reforms over the last five years have improved relations between our police and our communities,” he said, adding crime was at record lows and 150,000 fewer people were arrested last year than the year before we came into office. But some activists, including Garner’s family and the relatives of others killed by police, have argued the changes weren’t enough. De Blasio also said it was a mistake to wait for federal prosecutors to finish investigating the death of Garner before beginning disciplinary proceedings. But there is no fule requiring the NYPD to do so. Police reform advocates said the decision was upsetting but to be expected. Joo Hyun-Kang, the director of Communities for Police Reform, said it was “outrageous but not shocking.” Hawk Newsome, the head of New York area Black Lives Matter chapter said, “It’s America, man.” “As a black man in America I have no expectation that we will receive justice in court without radical change in this country,” said Newsome, who’s planning a Tuesday night rally in Harlem and a nationwide civil disobedience campaign. Chokeholds are banned under police policy. Pantaleo maintained he used a legal takedown manoeuvr called the “seatbelt.” But the medical examiner’s office said a chokehold contributed to Garner’s death. The NYPD brought Pantaleo up on departmental charges earlier this year. Federal prosecutors were observing the proceedings. An administrative judge has not ruled whether he violated policy. He could face dismissal, but Police Commissioner James O’Neill has the final say. In the years since the Garner death, Pantaleo has remained on the job but not in the field, and activists have decried his paycheque that included union-negotiated raises. ___ Balsamo reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Colleen Long in Washington, Tom Hays in New York and Karen Matthews in New York contributed to this report. Michael Balsamo, Michael R. Sisak And Tom Hays, The Associated Press

Greece: Suspect charged for US scientist’s slaying in Crete

News Talk 650 CKOM - 3 hours 8 min ago
ATHENS, Greece - A 27-year-old man was charged with murder and rape Tuesday in the killing of an American scientist who disappeared on the Greek island of Crete and whose body was found in a tunnel formerly used as a storage site during World War II. Crete police said a Greek man from the island confessed to the “violent criminal act,” telling investigators he struck Suzanne Eaton with his car and abducted her “motivated by the intention to commit sexual assault,” Crete police spokeswoman Eleni Papathanasiou said. Eaton, 59, went missing on July 2 while attending a scientific conference in Crete. Relatives said she had gone for a hike. Her body was found six days later after an extensive search. The suspect remains in police custody and will appear in court before being placed in pre-trial detention, court officials said. He has not been publicly named in accordance with Greek law. Papathanasiou said a coroner determined Eaton had “many broken ribs, and facial bones, and multiple injuries to both hands” and died from asphyxiation on the day of her disappearance. The suspect said he hit Eaton twice to stop her, the police spokeswoman said. “According to his claims, he placed the victim, unconscious, in the trunk of his car and transferred her to a ventilation drain in the wartime storage (tunnel), where after raping her, abandoned her there.” Crete Police chief Lt. Gen. Constantine Lagoudakis told reporters the investigation had been helped by video footage from closed-circuit cameras and questioning people in the area. “A particularly important element of our investigation was the discovery of recent tire tracks near the (tunnel). This, in conjunction with the position of the body when it was found, suggested that it had been transferred to the site,” Lagoudakis said. Eaton, from Armonk, New York, was based in Dresden, Germany, where she worked at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics. Police said she was visiting the island for a fourth time. ___ Follow Gatopoulos at https://twitter.com/dgatopoulos ___ Full AP coverage at https://www.apnews.com/Greece Derek Gatopoulos And Fanis Karabatsakis, The Associated Press

Sask. war artifacts museum begins work restoring WWI mortar

Saskatoon StarPhoenix - 3 hours 9 min ago
As part of his work as a historical interpreter, Kevin Hicks attended the anniversary in England of the Battle of the Somme in period attire. The remaining veterans of the battle, all almost a century old, waved him over for a chat. Read More

Facing censure, Trump insists ‘not a racist bone in my body’

News Talk 650 CKOM - 3 hours 24 min ago
WASHINGTON - Defiant in the face of widespread censure, President Donald Trump insisted Tuesday that his tweets suggesting four Democratic congresswomen of colour return to their countries “were NOT Racist,” and he appealed to fellow Republicans to “not show weakness” and to resist a House resolution condemning his words. “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” Trump exclaimed on Twitter, a day after declaring that “many people agree” with his assessment of the four freshman lawmakers. “Those Tweets were NOT Racist,” Trump wrote Tuesday amid a continued backlash to his weekend tweets that progressive women “go back” to their “broken and crime-infested” countries. The tweets, which have been widely denounced as racist, were directed at Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. All are American citizens, and three of the four were born in the U.S. Trump alleged again Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality “hate our Country.” The four lawmakers fired back late Monday, condemning what they called “xenophobic bigoted remarks” and renewing calls for Democrats to begin impeachment proceedings. The episode served notice that Trump is willing to again rely on incendiary rhetoric on issues of race and immigration to preserve his political base in the leadup to the 2020 election. He shrugged off the criticism. “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me,” Trump said Monday at the White House. “A lot of people love it, by the way.” At the Capitol, there was near unanimous condemnation from Democrats and a rumble of discontent from a subset of Republicans, but notably not from the party’s congressional leaders. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who said Trump’s campaign slogan truly means he wants to “make America white again,” announced Monday that the House would vote on a resolution condemning his new comments . The resolution “strongly condemns” Trump’s “racist comments” and says they “have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of colour.” In response, Trump tweeted anew Tuesday about the four congresswomen: “Why isn’t the House voting to rebuke the filthy and hate laced things they have said? Because they are the Radical Left, and the Democrats are afraid to take them on. Sad!” Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah, the party’s White House nominee in 2012 and now one of the president’s most vocal GOP critics, said Monday that Trump’s comments were “destructive, demeaning, and disunifying.” Trump dug in. “If you’re not happy in the U.S., if you’re complaining all the time, you can leave, you can leave right now,” he said. His words, which evoked the trope of telling black people to go back to Africa, may have been partly meant to widen the divides within the House Democratic caucus, which has been riven by internal debate over how best to oppose his policies. And while Trump’s attacks brought Democrats together in defence of their colleagues, his allies noted he was also having some success in making the progressive lawmakers the face of their party. The Republican president questioned whether Democrats should “want to wrap” themselves around this group of four people as he recited a list of the quartet’s most controversial statements. “Nancy Pelosi tried to push them away, but now they are forever wedded to the Democrat Party,” he wrote Tuesday, adding: “See you in 2020!” At a news conference with her three colleagues, Pressley referred to Trump as “the occupant of our White House” instead of president. “He does not embody the grace, the empathy, the compassion, the integrity that that office requires and that the American people deserve,” she said, encouraging people “not take the bait.” Pressley said Trump’s comments were “a disruptive distraction from the issues of care, concern and consequence to the American people” - prescription drug prices, affordable housing, health care.” Omar, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Somalia, accused him of “openly violating” the Constitution and sounded the call for impeachment proceedings. Ocasio-Cortez said Trump “does not know how to defend his policies and so what he does is attack us personally.” The Senate’s top Democrat, Chuck Schumer of New York, said his party would also try to force a vote in the GOP-controlled chamber. Trump, who won the presidency in 2016 in part by energizing disaffected voters with inflammatory racial rhetoric, made clear he has no intention of backing away from that strategy in 2020. “The Dems were trying to distance themselves from the four ‘progressives,’ but now they are forced to embrace them,” he tweeted Monday afternoon. “That means they are endorsing Socialism, hate of Israel and the USA! Not good for the Democrats!” Trump has faced few consequences for such attacks in the past. They typically earn him cycles of wall-to-wall media attention and little blowback from his party. He is wagering that his most steadfast supporters will be energized by the controversy as much, or if not more so, than the opposition. The president has told aides that he was giving voice to what many of his supporters believe - that they are tired of people, including immigrants, disrespecting their country, according to three Republicans close to the White House who were not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations. Trump singled out Omar, in particular, accusing her of having “hatred” for Israel and expressing “love” for “enemies like al-Qaida.” “These are people that, in my opinion, hate our country,” he said. Sen. Lindsey Graham, a close ally of the president who golfed with him over the weekend, advised him to “aim higher” during an appearance on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” even as he accused the four Democrats of being “anti-Semitic” and “anti-American.” Marc Short, chief of staff to Vice-President Mike Pence, said “I don’t think that the president’s intent in any way is racist,” pointing to Trump’s decision to choose Elaine Chao, who was born in Taiwan, as his transportation secretary. Chao is one of the few minorities among the largely white and male aides in high-profile roles in Trump’s administration. She is the wife of Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who declined comment Monday on Trump’s attacks. Among the few GOP lawmakers commenting Monday, Rep. Pete Olson of Texas said Trump’s tweets were “not reflective of the values of the 1,000,000+ people” in his district. “I urge our President immediately disavow his comments,” he wrote. In an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll from February 2017, half of Americans said the mixing of culture and values from around the world is an important part of America’s identity as a nation. About a third said the same of a culture established by early European immigrants. But partisans in that poll were divided over these aspects of America’s identity. About two-thirds of Democrats but only about a third of Republicans thought the mixing of world cultures was important to the country’s identity. By comparison, nearly half of Republicans but just about a quarter of Democrats saw the culture of early European immigrants as important to the nation. ___ Associated Press writer Hannah Fingerhut contributed to this report. ___ Lemire reported from New York. Follow Miller on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@ZekeJMiller , Colvin at http://twitter.com/@ColvinJ and Lemire at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire . Zeke Miller, Jill Colvin, And Jonathan Lemire, The Associated Press

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