Saskatoon News

Sask. announces one new COVID-19 case, new visitation guidelines

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:49
Visitation guidelines for a number of facilities in Saskatchewan will be changing starting Tuesday. In a media release Friday, the provincial government said guidelines for acute and long-term care homes, personal care homes and group homes are being amended. The announcement was made at the same time Saskatchewan reported one new case of COVID-19 and 10 more recoveries. The new case, which is in the far north, increased the provincial total to date to 796. According to the government, two family members or support people can provide assistance to patients and residents of care homes. Only one family member or support person can be present in the facility at a time. However, two people can be present at a time - provided physical distancing can be maintained - for critical care/intensive care patients, end of life/palliative care patients or residents, and maternal services units (maternal and postpartum units, neonatal intensive care units, pediatric intensive care units, or pediatric units). Family members and support people must follow safety requirements that already are in place, including wearing of medical-grade masks, physical distancing, hand hygiene and so on. The new guidelines apply to patients, outpatients, clients and residents in all Saskatchewan Health Authority facilities, long-term care homes and affiliate organizations, personal care homes, and Ministry of Social Services group homes. A look at the numbers The recoveries announced Friday mean there have been 711 reported so far in Saskatchewan. To date, 14 residents of the province have died due to complications from the coronavirus. There are 71 active cases in Saskatchewan. Three people - two in the north and one in Saskatoon - are in intensive care. One individual is receiving inpatient care in Saskatoon. More to come.

Sask. announces one new COVID-19 case, new visitation guidelines

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:46
Visitation guidelines for a number of facilities in Saskatchewan will be changing starting Tuesday. In a media release Friday, the provincial government said guidelines for acute and long-term care homes, personal care homes and group homes are being amended. The announcement was made at the same time Saskatchewan reported one new case of COVID-19 and 10 more recoveries. The new case, which is in the far north, increased the provincial total to date to 796. According to the government, two family members or support people can provide assistance to patients and residents of care homes. Only one family member or support person can be present in the facility at a time. However, two people can be present at a time — provided physical distancing can be maintained — for critical care/intensive care patients, end of life/palliative care patients or residents, and maternal services units (maternal and postpartum units, neonatal intensive care units, pediatric intensive care units, or pediatric units). Family members and support people must follow safety requirements that already are in place, including wearing of medical-grade masks, physical distancing, hand hygiene and so on. The new guidelines apply to patients, outpatients, clients and residents in all Saskatchewan Health Authority facilities, long-term care homes and affiliate organizations, personal care homes, and Ministry of Social Services group homes. A look at the numbers The recoveries announced Friday mean there have been 711 reported so far in Saskatchewan. To date, 14 residents of the province have died due to complications from the coronavirus. There are 71 active cases in Saskatchewan. Three people — two in the north and one in Saskatoon — are in intensive care. One individual is receiving inpatient care in Saskatoon. More to come.

Oklahoma State’s Gundy takes pay cut in wake of T-shirt flap

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:44
STILLWATER, Okla. - Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy took a $1-million pay cut and had his contract shortened by a year as part of an internal review prompted by sharp criticism from his star running back for wearing a T-shirt promoting a far-right news channel. Athletic director Mike Holder said Friday the adjustments to Gundy's contract were the coach's idea. Holder reiterated his belief Gundy has always treated Black players well a day after releasing a statement saying the review found "no sign or indication of racism" in the football program. Two weeks ago, Canadian running back Chuba Hubbard lashed out at Gundy on social media for wearing a T-shirt promoting One America News Network. Hubbard, a native of Sherwood Park, Alta., who's Black, suggested he may boycott the program; OANN has been critical of the Black Lives Matter movement. "I think it's awakened him or alerted him to the fact that he wasn't as close as his players and he needs to be," Holder said of Gundy. "He's going to change that." Holder said Gundy's rollover contract was reduced from five years to four and the guarantee was cut from 75% to 50%. The buyout also was dropped from $5 million to $4 million. Holder didn't say whether the $1-million pay cut was a one-time arrangement or something that would happen annually. "The changes were offered up by Mike Gundy, and I commend him for that," Holder said. "I think it really demonstrates his commitment to being a better coach. And he wanted to make a statement that assured all players that this wasn't just about talk." Asked about Hubbard being criticized for lashing out at his coach publicly before speaking to him privately, Holder said he was glad Hubbard did speak out. "All the players should be commended for having the courage to speak up," Holder said. "We need more of that in society, not less. That doesn't mean the players are in control. There's a reason that adults are in the leadership positions." Gundy, who is white, apologized after appearing with Hubbard in a video. Gundy also apologized in April after a media session in which he called the coronavirus the "Chinese virus." Last week, the school announced a new diversity council that will include students, athletes and alumni. Holder said he didn't keep track of how many athletes he interviewed following Hubbard's criticism, saying it was about 20. Holder said "the majority" of players interviewed were Black. "The missing link has been a more personal relationship with their head coach," Holder said. "They respect him. He's an excellent game-day coach. But they want more coaching on a personal level. This crosses all racial lines. To a man, our players want a better connection to Mike Gundy." ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 The Associated Press

Saskatchewan weather outlook: July 3

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:42
The seven-day Saskatchewan weather forecast with Global’s Peter Quinlan for Friday, July 3.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Suspicious death in Warman, Sask., prompts RCMP investigation

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:41
Saskatchewan RCMP say they will remain in the area throughout Friday to conduct their investigation.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Saskatchewan’s judiciary is 91% white; judge says diversity builds trust

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:39
Just five judges and justices identify as Indigenous and three as a visible minority, according to the justice ministry.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Saskatchewan man charged after fatal multi-vehicle crash in Manitoba

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:37
A 56-year-old trucker from Saskatchewan is facing charges after two people were killed and 15 others were injured in a multi-vehicle crash on a Manitoba highway. In a media release, the Manitoba RCMP said the crash happened Thursday at about 11:50 a.m., on Highway 2 about three kilometres east of Fannystelle. That town is about 55 kilometres west of Winnipeg. The Mounties say several vehicles were stopped at a marked construction zone in which work was being done. As the vehicles waited to drive through the construction zone, an eastbound semi didn’t stop and drove into the vehicles. The crash ultimately involved two semis, five passenger vehicles and a motorcycle. A seven-year-old girl from Winnipeg and a 61-year-old man from the RM of St. Andrews in Manitoba were pronounced dead at the scene. The girl was a passenger in one of the vehicles, while the man was riding the motorcycle. Of the 15 people who were injured, six were taken to hospital. Three of those people since have been released. A 22-year-old woman and two girls, ages 10 and 14, are in hospital with serious injuries. The driver of the semi was arrested and charged with three counts of dangerous operation of a conveyance causing bodily harm and two counts each of dangerous operation of a conveyance causing death and criminal negligence causing death. The Carman RCMP is continuing to investigate.

One in custody as Sask RCMP investigate suspicious death in Warman

Saskatoon StarPhoenix - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:25
A person is in custody following a suspicious death in Warman Friday. Read More

Reps: Singers Kacey Musgraves, Ruston Kelly file for divorce

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:23
NEW YORK - Grammy-winning country singer Kacey Musgraves and her musician-husband, Ruston Kelly, have filed for divorce. Representatives for both singers confirmed the news Friday to The Associated Press. In a joint statement, Musgraves and Kelly said "we've made this painful decision together." "With heavy but hopeful hearts we wanted to put our own thoughts into the air about what's happening. These kinds of announcements are always met with scrutiny and speculation and we want to stop that before it even starts. We believe that we were put into each other's lives for a divine reason and have both changed each other infinitely for the better. The love we have for each other goes far beyond the relationship we've shared as husband and wife. It's a soul connection that can never be erased," the emailed statement read. "We've made this painful decision together - a healthy decision that comes after a very long period of trying the best we can. It simply just didn't work. Though we are parting ways in marriage, we will remain true friends for the rest of our lives. We hold no blame, anger, or contempt for each other and we ask for privacy and positive wishes for us both as we learn how to navigate through this," the statement continued. Musgraves and Kelly, both 31, were married in 2017. Musgraves has been a success since releasing her major-label debut album, "Same Trailer Different Park," in 2013. It won her the best country album Grammy and one of its singles, "Merry Go 'Round," won best country song. At the 2019 Grammys, the superstar's critically acclaimed pop-leaning country album, "Golden Hour," won all four awards it was nominated for, including the coveted top prize, album of the year. At the show, she thanked Kelly in her acceptance speech: "I really believe I wouldn't have this album if I hadn't met you and you didn't open my heart like you did, so thank you so much." Musgraves and Kelly have worked together musically. In 2018 they appeared on the song "To June This Morning" from the album "Johnny Cash: Forever Words," a compilation project created from Cash's unknown poetry, lyrics and letters set to music. Musgraves also sang background vocals on Kelly's 2018 full-length debut album, "Dying Star." Kelly will release a new album, "Shape & Destroy," on Aug. 28, and it will include background vocals by Musgraves. Kelly's father and sister are also featured on the album. Kelly has also written songs for other artists, including Tim McGraw, Hayes Carll, Lucie Silvas and Josh Abbott Band. Musgraves co-wrote Miranda Lambert's 2013 country hit, "Mama's Broken Heart," earning herself a Grammy nomination as a songwriter. Mesfin Fekadu, The Associated Press

CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos announce they’ll be retaining their team name

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:19
EDMONTON - The Edmonton Eskimos are keeping their team name. The CFL franchise announced Friday it was keeping the Eskimos moniker following "an extensive year-long formal research and engagement program with Inuit leaders and community members across Canada." "The consistent feedback was a desire for more engagement with the club," the Eskimos said in a statement. "There were a range of views regarding the club's name but no consensus emerged to support a name change. "The club has therefore decided to retain its name." However, the Eskimos didn't divulge specific results of its program. Also on Friday, the NFL's Washington Redskins announced they were undergoing a "thorough review" of their nickname. In a statement, the club said recent events in the United States and feedback from the community prompted the review. The Eskimos said their research and engagement program "included meetings with Inuit leaders and community leaders in Iqaluit, Inuvik, Yellowknife and Ottawa; and a research phase with a combination of in-depth interviews with Inuit across the north and in Edmonton, and a telephone survey among a broad group of Inuit across Canada." Janice Agrios, the chair of Edmonton's board of directors, said the survey was a learning experience. "The research program provided the club with many insights," Agrios said in a statement. "A key learning for us was the desire of northern communities to increase the club's engagement with them. "As a result, we have invested the time and resources to create a Northern Community Engagement Program and will continue to engage with Inuit leaders and community members to strengthen the ties between the club and the Inuit community." The CFL club said the engagement program held school visits in Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk in October 2019 while also hosting the Youth Service Award winners that month. It also participated in the Inuvik Sunrise Festival in January. The Edmonton club added seven communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region have asked about holding similar programming. "Since launching the Northern Community Engagement Program, we have been warmly welcomed in the communities that we have visited," Agrios said. "The consistent message was 'come back and come more often.' "We are the CFL's most northern team and we want to continue to build our relationship with the Inuit community. This is a very important initiative for us." The franchise says it will be "increasing its engagement in Canada's north," but again didn't provide specific details.   This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 3, 2020. The Canadian Press

RCMP investigating suspicious death in Warman

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:06
One person was taken into custody Friday as the RCMP investigated a suspicious death in Warman. The RCMP Major Crimes Unit North and the Warman RCMP were on the scene of a suspicious death that happened in the 200 block of Third Street West. The RCMP said there wasn’t any known threat to the public. The Mounties said residents in the area could expect to see an increased police presence throughout the day Friday.

Sask. Rattlers tip off for summer series July 26

CTV Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:04
The Saskatchewan Rattlers could be the first local pro sports team to resume competition since the COVID-19 pandemic began.
Categories: Saskatoon News

11 MLAs make final appearance in Saskatchewan legislature

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 13:02
Seven MLAs from the governing Saskatchewan Party and four from the Saskatchewan NDP are retiring from office.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Canada’s long-term care system failed elders, before and during COVID-19: report

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:54
MONTREAL - A new report on the COVID-19 crisis in long-term care homes has concluded that Canada failed in its duty to protect its elders.    The report released today by the Royal Society of Canada found the pandemic was a "shock wave" that exposed many long-standing deficiencies in the system. The group's COVID-19 task force of scientists and researchers said the causes of the failure are complex but are rooted in what they call systemic and deeply institutionalized attitudes about age and gender. It found that 81 per cent of Canada's COVID-19 deaths have come in long-term care homes, far higher than what is reported in comparable countries, including a 31 per cent figure in the United States and 66 per cent in Spain. The authors say Canadian homes have allowed staff-to-patient ratios to drop and have increasingly shifted to an unregulated workforce in recent years, even as patients are living longer with diseases that require increasingly complex care. Their recommendations include implementing national standards for care homes, better data collection and infection-control standards, as well as higher pay, more full-time positions and better benefits for workers, including sick leave and mental health support. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 3, 2020 The Canadian Press

Presidential hopeful Biden could be swayed to supporting Keystone XL: Kenney

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:43
OYEN, Alta. - Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he believes United States presidential hopeful Joe Biden can be swayed to supporting the Keystone XL pipeline. The presumptive Democratic nominee has vowed to rip up President Donald Trump's approval of the Alberta-to-Texas crude oil conduit if his party wins back the White House this fall.    Kenney says his government would be reaching out to Democrats who support the project, as well as unions with members who would be put to work building it. The premier says he believes those allies would impress upon Biden's campaign the importance of the project to North American energy independence and national security. He adds the federal government should remind Biden's team that cancelling the $8 billion pipeline expansion would mean a "terrible blow" to the Canada-U.S. trading relationship. Kenney made his remarks at a TC Energy pipe yard in Oyen, Alta., where he and industry officials celebrated the beginning of construction on the pipeline's Canadian segment. "We will use every tool at our disposal to get this project done," the premier said Friday. He said that involves doing what the province can to help TC Energy fight U.S. court battles against the project and stepping up Alberta's presence south of the border, including with a new office in Houston. Keystone XL is an expansion to an existing pipeline network to increase the flow of Alberta heavy oil to Gulf Coast refineries by up to 830,000 barrels a day. It was first proposed in 2008 and has been dealt a litany of legal and regulatory setbacks over the years. It has been met with fierce opposition on environmental grounds.   Calgary-based TC Energy green-lighted Keystone XL in March, following the Alberta government's pledge to take a $1.5 billion equity stake and provide a $6 billion loan guarantee to ensure work started immediately. "This is about leadership and you can't do that without taking risks," Kenney said. "And so we have taken a conscious risk to get construction started, to create facts on the ground and we look forward to working with the many key leaders in the United States to support that." - By Lauren Krugel in Calgary This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 3, 2020. Companies in this story: (TSX:TRP) The Canadian Press

Ethiopia’s PM accuses dissidents of taking up arms in unrest

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:39
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Ethiopia's prime minister on Friday said dissidents he recently extended an offer of peace have "taken up arms" in revolt against the government in a week of deadly unrest that followed the killing of a popular singer. Those who participate "in the destruction of the nation cannot be considered guardians of the nation," Abiy Ahmed said. Police earlier this week told the state broadcaster more than 80 people were killed following the shooting death on Monday of Hachalu Hundessa, a prominent voice in anti-government protests that led to Abiy coming to power in 2018. The military has been deployed, and hundreds of cars this week were burned or damaged in the tense capital, Addis Ababa. The new unrest poses the prime minister's greatest domestic test since he took office. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize last year for dramatic reforms, including welcoming home once-banned exile groups, but the more open political space has seen some Ethiopians air ethnic and other grievances. At times it has led to deadly violence, and human rights groups have accused security forces of abuses. Ethiopia's internet service has been cut again this week, making it difficult for rights monitor and others to track the scores of killings. "It's a moment when people need to pause and de-escalate," said Murithi Mutiga, project director for the Horn of Africa with the International Crisis Group. He cited a series of challenges in Ethiopia including an armed insurgency in parts of the country and tension over the timing of the next election. The government recently delayed the vote, citing the coronavirus pandemic. "This is not the first but one in a long line of grave provocations by an actor not yet identified," Mutiga said, adding that the "wiser course of action is to strive to create an atmosphere of reconciliation and dialogue." Ethiopia's prime minister on Thursday hinted there could be links between this unrest and the killing of the army chief last year as well as the grenade thrown at one of his own rallies in 2018. Police late Wednesday said three people had been arrested in the death of the singer, who was buried Thursday in a ceremony shown on national television. The past few days appear to be the most serious challenge yet to Ethiopia's transition to multifaceted democracy, Mutiga said. "Thankfully, the situation seems to have calmed down in Addis and parts of Oromia but the scale of the violence, the degree of grievance witnessed on the streets and the danger of instability was quite high." Abiy in comments after meeting with officials on Friday said those behind the unrest should "rethink their motives," and those responsible for destructive actions will be held accountable. He added that those opposed to the government should contest power through "ideas and policy options." Arrests this week included that of a well-known Oromo activist, Jawar Mohammed, and more than 30 supporters. It is not clear what charges they might face. The Oromo make up Ethiopia's largest ethnic group but had never held the country's top post until they helped bring Abiy to power. The arrest of opposition figures "could make a volatile situation even worse," Human Rights Watch has said. ___ Cara Anna in Johannesburg contributed. Elias Meseret, The Associated Press

Saskatoon police charge two in connection to human trafficking

Saskatoon StarPhoenix - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:37
Two men are facing human trafficking-related charges after police were called about a 23-year-old woman who had reportedly been held in a residence over an unspecified period of time. Read More

Five things to watch as Blue Jays open training camp in Toronto

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:32
Most MLB players are beginning their summer training camps Friday in preparation for the abbreviated season, but the Blue Jays will be slightly delayed. Toronto's location north of the currently closed Canada-U.S. border made things more difficult for the team, which needed permission from the Canadian government to hold camp here. The Blue Jays got the OK Thursday night - so far for training only. A decision is still to be made on whether the team can host regular-season games at Rogers Centre when they begin later this month. Here are five things to watch from Blue Jays camp over the next couple weeks:  COVID CASES Professional athletes have been testing positive for the novel coronavirus at an alarming rate over the last few weeks, including several Blue Jays players and staff. Florida reported a record-high 10,109 new cases Thursday. Pinellas County, where the Blue Jays' spring training facility is located in Dunedin, Fla., recorded 358 new cases the same day. The Blue Jays have been undergoing intake and screening procedures at their Dunedin facility this week in preparation to head north. Team president and CEO Mark Shapiro said players will need two negative COVID-19 tests before they can leave for Toronto. MLB says players will be tested every other day for COVID both in camp and throughout the regular season. Daily temperature and symptom checks and a monthly blood-drawn antibody test will also be the norm. BACKLASH POTENTIAL MLB's plan to travel between cities during the regular season and playoffs means there's a greater chance of spreading COVID-19 from one area to another. And if the Blue Jays are cleared to host games in Toronto there could be backlash from that. Ontario, which has been reopening in phases throughout the province, has been averaging well under 200 new daily cases over the last week. Regions the Blue Jays will be travelling to vary in terms of their COVID prevalence. As of Thursday, there were 872 new cases in the state of New York (Yankees and Mets); 195 in Massachusetts (Boston Red Sox); 513 in Maryland (Baltimore Orioles); 839 in Pennsylvania (Philadelphia Phillies); 25 in Washington, D.C. (Nationals); 2,886 in Georgia (Atlanta Braves); and 10,109 in Florida (Tampa Bay Rays and Miami Marlins).  They will play 60 regular-season games (including 30 on the road) in 66 days. Players are being asked to self-isolate in a hotel when not at the field, but separating them entirely from other members of society - including hotel staff and security guards at the stadium, for example - could prove difficult. Regular testing should help isolate positive cases quickly, however. NEW RULES There will be no high-fiving or spitting on the field this summer and no showers after games, part of MLB's new rules aimed to help mitigate a COVID-19 outbreak. The league sent a 101-page health protocol document to teams last week that players are expected to abide by, but some of the new regulations may take more getting used to than others. Clubhouses are also getting a makeover as lockers move the appropriate two metres apart, and kitchens can no longer operate buffet style. Players are expected to keep distance during training drills on the field and safe protocols are to be in place for boarding team buses. There are also some new rules for play itself, including the use of a designated hitter in both leagues. Extra innings will begin with a runner on second base in an effort to speed things up. PROSPECT WATCH The Blue Jays' unveiled a prospect-loaded player pool last week, naming the players (teams can have up to 60) that will train with the team at camp. Among the list is Toronto's top prospect, right-handed pitcher Nate Pearson, who was expected to begin the season in triple-A. But with the COVID-19 pandemic cancelling minor-league baseball, there's nowhere for him to play but in the big leagues. The same goes for players like right-handers Alek Manoah and Simeon Woods Richardson, the prospects returned to Toronto in the Marcus Stroman trade last season. Shortstop Jordan Groshans, the Blue Jays' first-round pick in 2018, and catching prospect Alejandro Kirk also made the list.  Sunday was the deadline for teams to submit player pools, but additions can be made later. This gives the Blue Jays flexibility to add more players, including their first-round draft pick this year, 21-year-old infielder Austin Martin of Vanderbilt who is still unsigned. Active rosters will allow up to 30 players to start the season, then reduce to 28 after two weeks. A 26-man active roster will come into play two weeks after that. SHAKING OFF THE RUST Players will have been out of action for 16 weeks when camps officially begin Friday - roughly three weeks less than a regular off-season from October to February. And this hasn't been a regular three-and-a-half months off.  Players who chose not to stay near their respective teams' spring training facilities when the pre-season was cancelled in March have likely had limited access to gyms and training centres. MLB teams have worked on revised fitness plans for their players throughout the layoff, but pitchers who've been unable to throw to live hitters, and hitters unable to face live pitching will likely be rusty. Players will have three weeks to get up to game speed before the regular season is scheduled to begin - that's about half the time they usually get with spring training. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 3, 2020. Melissa Couto, The Canadian Press

Trucker charged with killing man, child in Manitoba construction zone crash

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:32
Manitoba RCMP say a semi driver is facing charges in the deaths of two people after he allegedly drove into a lineup of vehicles stopped in a construction zone.
Categories: Saskatoon News

End of pandemic contract upsets Sask. family doctors

CTV Saskatoon - Fri, 07/03/2020 - 12:28
Family practice doctors with the Saskatchewan Medical Association say they were left out of the government’s decision-making process.
Categories: Saskatoon News

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