Saskatoon News

Copyright collective can’t force tariffs on university, Supreme Court rules

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 09:35
OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada says a copyright collective cannot force York University to pay specific tariffs for the use of published works in the classroom. In its unanimous decision today, the high court says the law does not empower the Access Copyright collective to enforce royalty payments set out in a tariff approved by a federal board if a user chooses not to be bound by a licence.  The Supreme Court heard the case in response to appeals on distinct aspects from both York and Access Copyright, which administers reproduction rights for published works, collects royalties and distributes them to copyright holders.  After licence renewal negotiations between York and Access Copyright hit a stalemate, the university briefly complied with an interim tariff approved by a federal board but then opted out, introducing its own "fair dealing" guidelines.  Under the guidelines, York faculty and staff paid no licence fees for a significant amount of material.  The Federal Court of Canada allowed Access Copyright's action to enforce the interim tariff, but York successfully contested the point in the Federal Court of Appeal. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021. The Canadian Press

Canada extends pandemic benefits through to Oct. 23

CTV Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 09:31
The federal government is tapping the brakes on its plans to phase out pandemic aid programs this summer, deciding instead to freeze benefits at current levels and extend help by an extra month beyond the previously planned end date.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Freeland says Liberals will extend aid programs to October because of uneven rebound

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 09:25
OTTAWA — Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland says the government is extending pandemic aid programs by an extra month beyond the previously planned end date. The decision means that wage and rent subsidies for businesses, and income support for workers out of a job or who need to take time off to care for family or stay home sick, will last until Oct. 23. Freeland says the government is also freezing rates for the wage and rent subsidies at current levels, holding off on the previously planned decline. She adds that benefits will also be frozen at $300 per week for the three "recovery" benefits, and four more weeks of eligibility will be added to a maximum of 54 weeks. Freeland says extending the aid is necessary because many small businesses and workers are not yet fully back on their feet. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021. The Canadian Press

Assistant in Regina-Wascana MP Michael Kram’s office suspended pending discrimination investigation

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 09:09
An employee of Conservative MP Michael Kram has been suspended over claims of allegedly insensitive comments made toward two people who visited the office.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Finance Department says federal deficit was $23.8 billion deficit over April and May

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 09:02
OTTAWA — The federal government ran a deficit of nearly $24 billion over the first two months of its fiscal year, a sharp drop from the unprecedented spending one year earlier at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Finance Department's regular fiscal monitor says the budgetary deficit over April and May was $23.8 billion, down from the $86.8 billion recorded over the same months in 2020. The department's report says the drop in spending was expected given the improved conditions from last spring when the economy had a historic slide, prompting the federal treasury to pump out an unprecedented amount of emergency aid. The fiscal monitor says the deficit now reflects ongoing economic challenges, including the effect of third-wave lockdowns and ongoing spending on emergency aid that is scheduled to wrap up this fall. Program spending, excluding net actuarial losses, was almost $76.9 billion over April and May, a decline of about $37 billion, or a 32.5 per cent drop, from the $113.8 billion in the same period one year earlier. Revenues reached over $59.5 billion over April and May, which was a $27.1-billion, or 83.6 per cent, year-over-year increase from the $32.4 billion in the previous fiscal year. The fiscal monitor says the result is largely due to the steep drop in tax revenues at the onset of the pandemic as large parts of the economy were shuttered. Public debt charges increased by $300 million, or 9.1 per cent, to $3.9 billion from the almost $3.6 billion in the previous fiscal year. The Finance Department says the change is due to higher inflation adjustments on real return bonds, offset partially by lower interest on treasury bills and the government's pension and benefit obligations. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021. The Canadian Press

Long weekend barbecue ideas with Maddie and Kiki

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 08:15
BBQ entertainers Maddie and Kiki join Global News Morning with some grilling ideas for the August long weekend, with snacks for you and your pets from the barbecue.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Show Segments

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 08:06
Gormley, with guest host Mike Couros, Friday, July 30, 2021 8:30 – As we head into another summer long weekend, The Hutterian Emergency Response Team (HEART) is hoping they do not get called for another recovery.  The team, based out of Manitoba, travels across the country to support search and rescue and recovery efforts when people go missing or drown in rivers and lakes.  Their dive team uses robot navigation with sonar equipment. Their most recent Saskatchewan call was for a 36-year-old man who drowned in Lake Diefenbaker on Canada Day when he jumped in to save a struggling child.  On July 22, HEART located his body.  Manuel Maendel is a co-pilot for HEART and he joins Mike to tell us more about their team and the recoveries they have performed. LIVE: Manuel Maendel, HEART co-pilot. 9:00 – The Ultimate Open Lines. 10:00 – Earlier this month on a Wednesday evening, Cole Chorney and his wife who is 8-months pregnant had just finished a supper out in downtown Saskatoon when they decided to go for a walk and enjoy the nice summer evening.  They were just a few minutes into their walk when Cole says he was attacked by a man with a knife.  Cole says it’s concerning that such a beautiful place which is often full with families and children can be so dangerous and he joins Mike to share his story. LIVE: Cole Chorney, attacked in downtown Saskatoon. 10:30 – “But wait! There’s more” – the infomercial icon known for this famous line has died.  TV pitchman and inventor Ron Popeil died Wednesday at the age of 86. He’s known for items like the Veg-O-Matic, the Pocket Fisherman, Mr. Microphone and the Showtime Rotisserie and BBQ.  What’s the best or worst ‘as seen on TV’ purchase you have ever made? Give us a call at 1-877-332-8255. 11:00 – What time is it? It’s Eatin’ Time! with Belton Johnson – powered by the Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association! Grillmaster Belton Johnson joins Mike with his recipe for Burnt Ends! LIVE: Belton Johnson. 11:30 – It’s summer holiday time, the kids are out of school, we take time off work to head to the lake or cabin or pack up the camper for a road trip, but how many of us actually unplug during our holidays? Can you still be reached by your work email? Would you be brave enough to shut your phone off? A study done out of the Ontario branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association found that out of 2,598 employees who were able to do work remotely, only 27 per cent actually unplugged from their job while on vacation. Do you unplug? Give us a call at 1-877-332-8255.

Delta variant is so transmissible 'the war has changed,' U.S. CDC warns

CTV Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 08:04
The Delta coronavirus variant surging across the United States appears to cause more severe illness and spread as easily as chickenpox, according to an internal document from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Canadian Olympic performance inspiring Saskatoon swimmers

Global Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 07:42
Canada’s medal performance in swimming at the Olympics has been inspiring people across the country, including at the Saskatoon Goldfins Swim Club.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Canada captures Olympic gold in women’s eight; soccer women advance to semis

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 07:27
It was a gold medal nearly 30 years in making, and it came in dominant fashion on Tokyo Bay. Canada women's eight led from start to finish at the Tokyo Olympics on Friday, racing to its first gold medal in the event since the 1992 Barcelona Games. It was a performance reminiscent of Canada's rowing glory days in the 1990s, when Kathleen Heddle and current chef de mission Marnie McBean headlined a dominant crew. The crew saw the thunderclouds in the sky as a sign that Heddle, who died of cancer at the age of 55 earlier this year, was there in spirit.  "It was just a reminder that Kathleen was with us — and we're the storm and we're going to bring it," Susanne Grainger said. "We had a moment as a boat to remember her and make sure we brought the amazing grace and grit she rowed with into our race." Grainger, Lisa Roman, Kasia Gruchalla-Wesierski, Christine Roper, Andrea Proske, Madison Mailey, Sydney Payne, Avalon Wasteneys and coxswain Kristen Kit flew over the 2,000-metre distance, finishing with a time of five minutes 59.13 seconds. New Zealand grabbed silver (6:00.04), while China took bronze (6:01.21). The gold-medal performance came one day after Victoria's Caileigh Filmer and Hillary Janssens of Surrey, B.C., earned a bronze Thursday in the women's pair.  Roman said the win is "huge" for Canada's rowers, who are coming off a disappointing performance five years ago in Rio, where the program secured only one medal.   "We've worked so hard," she said. "I'm so grateful I got to be a part of this." In women's soccer, Team Canada advanced to the semifinals after a gruelling win over Brazil that was determined by penalty kicks. Vanessa Gilles had the decisive goal and goalkeeper Stephanie Labbé sealed the win with a diving two-handed save on Brazilian defender Rafaelle as Canada won 4-3 on penalty kicks. Jessie Fleming, Ashley Lawrence and Adriana Leon also scored for Canada. The two teams held each other scoreless through regulation and extra time, despite close calls by both teams.  Those included when Leon, a late substitute, charged down the right wing in the 105th minute, firing a bouncing shot toward the Brazilian goal that went just wide. In another instance, Labbé kept Canada in the game in the 118th minute, punching away a header from Brazil's Erika to keep the game 0-0. "That's what the Olympics are about, these tight games that bring out performances that make us really proud," Labbé said. There were also near-misses for two of Canada's most celebrated Olympians on Friday.  Swimmer Penny Oleksiak finished fourth in the women's 100-metre freestyle, an event she won in Rio, while two-time defending gold medallist Rosie MacLennan finished fourth in the women's trampoline. MacLennan finished with a score of 55.460, less than three-tenths of a point short of Britain's Bryony Page for bronze. The 32-year-old revealed that she'd been fighting an ankle injury that had left her on crutches and wearing a walking boot only weeks before the Olympics.  Xueying Zhu and Lingling Liu, both of China, took gold and silver, respectively. Another swimming medal would have made six-time medallist Oleksiak Canada's most decorated Olympian of all-time. Oleksiak tried, swimming her fastest time and eclipsing the Olympic record of 52.70 that she and American Simone Manuel set together in 2016 when they tied for gold. But Australia's Emma McKeon lowered the record to 51.96 en route to Friday's victory, ahead of Siobhan Haughey of Hong Kong who touched in 52.27. The 21-year-old from Toronto appeared philosophical about missing the record.  "I have six Olympic medals. There's only three people in Canada that can say that," she said. The other two are speedskater Cindy Klassen and cyclist/speedskater Clara Hughes. Oleksiak gets another chance at that historic medal in Sunday's medley relay, where she's expected to swim the final freestyle leg. If not, Oleksiak points out that she's still young — and there will be another Olympics in just three years.  In track and field, Canada will have two runners in the men's 3,000-metre steeplechase final after solid runs in the heats by Matt Hughes and John Gay. But there was heartbreak for Melissa Bishop-Nriagu as the world silver medallist and Canadian record-holder finished fourth in her heat of the women's 800 metres and didn't advance. Canada's Moh Ahmed finished sixth in the men's 10,000 metres. Ahmed pushed the pace when he took the lead with 600 metres to go, but he couldn't hold on. In other action, the men's volleyball team won their match against Venezuela, bringing their record to 2-2 and improving their chances at making the quarterfinals.  Canadian divers Jennifer Abel and Pamela Ware qualified for the semifinals of the women's three-metre springboard event after finishing third and fourth, respectively, in Friday's preliminary round. In sailing, Canada's Sarah Douglas qualified for the medal race in the women's laser radial classification. Douglas finished second in the 10th and final preliminary race to qualify fourth for Sunday's final. But Canada's hopes of earning another medal in women's rugby sevens were dashed when the team finished third in Pool B and missed the quarterfinals. The Canadian squad won bronze in the sport's Olympic debut in 2016. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021.  The Canadian Press

Japan expands virus emergency after record spikes amid Games

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 06:31
TOKYO (AP) — Japan expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo on Friday following record spikes in infections as the capital hosts the Olympics. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared an emergency in Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, near Tokyo, as well as in the western city of Osaka, effective Monday until Aug. 31. Emergency measures already in place in Tokyo will be extended until the end of August, after the Olympics and well into the Paralympics which start Aug. 24. Tokyo has reported a record increase in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday, before logging another 3,300 on Friday. The cases have doubled since last week, although officials say the surge is unrelated to the Olympics. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. TOKYO (AP) — Japan is set to expand the coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo to neighboring areas and the western city of Osaka on Friday in the wake of a record surge in infections while the capital hosts the Olympics. A government panel approved the plan putting Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, as well as Osaka, under the state of emergency from Monday until Aug. 31. The measures already in place in Tokyo and the southern island of Okinawa will be extended until the end of August. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is scheduled to officially announce the measures later Friday. Five other areas, including Hokkaido, Kyoto, Hyogo and Fukuoka, will be placed under less-stringent emergency restrictions. Tokyo has reported a record rise in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday. The cases have doubled since last week, and officials have warned they may hit 4,500 a day within two weeks. Officials said 2,995 were hospitalized, about half the current capacity of 6,000 beds, with some hospitals already full. More than 10,000 others were isolating at home or designated hotels, with nearly 5,600 waiting at home while health centers decide where they will be treated. Tokyo is also setting up a facility for those requiring oxygen while waiting for hospital beds. At Friday’s meeting of government experts, Health Minister Norihisa Tamura said the spike in Tokyo despite being under the state of emergency for two weeks is an “alarming development that is different from anything we have seen before.” Nationwide, Japan reported 10,687 confirmed cases Thursday, exceeding 10,000 for the first time. It has recorded 15,166 fatalities from COVID-19, including 2,288 in Tokyo, since the pandemic began. Japan has kept its cases and deaths lower than many other countries, but its seven-day rolling average is growing and now stands at 28 per 100,000 people nationwide and 88 per 100,000 in Tokyo, according to the Health Ministry. This compares to 18.5 in the United States, 48 in Britain and 2.8 in India, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The emergency measures focus on an alcohol ban at eateries and karaoke bars and their shortened hours, but they have become less effective because people are only requested to stay and work from home. Many were defying the measures as they have become tired of restrictive life and less cooperative even at a time when the more infectious delta strain is spreading. “We need to come up with measures that are effective,” Tokyo Gov Yuriko Koike told a regular news conference Friday, without elaborating. Noting that adults in their 30s or younger dominate recent cases, Koike reminded them of following basic anti-virus measures including mask-wearing and avoiding having parties, urging them to “share the sense of crisis.” As of Thursday, 27% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated. The percentage of the elderly who are fully vaccinated is 71.5%. Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press

Ottawa drummer squirrelled away 1968 Joni Mitchell tape recorded by Jimi Hendrix

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 06:25
OTTAWA — An Ottawa drummer with a passion for collecting reel-to-reel tapes deserves applause for the coming release of a Joni Mitchell performance recorded over half a century ago by none other than virtuoso guitarist Jimi Hendrix. The impromptu 1968 recording session of blossoming singer-songwriter Mitchell at the national capital’s Le Hibou Coffee House has long been the stuff of pop music lore, documented in Hendrix’s diary. But the tape’s fate was a mystery for decades. Mitchell announced this week that selections from the Ottawa gig would be included on a volume of archival recordings from 1968-71 to be released in October. A 24-year-old Mitchell was in the middle of a two-week stint at Le Hibou on March 19, 1968, when Hendrix, playing the nearby Capitol Theatre, phoned the Alberta-born songstress, whom he would soon dub “fantastic girl with heaven words” in his diary. “I think I’ll record her tonight with my excellent tape recorder (knock on wood) … hmmm … can’t find any wood … everything’s plastic,” he wrote. In liner notes from Mitchell’s forthcoming release, posted on her website, she recalls the evening vividly. “They came and told me, ‘Jimi Hendrix is here, and he’s at the front door.’ I went to meet him. He had a large box. He said to me, ‘My name is Jimi Hendrix. I’m on the same label as you. Reprise Records.’ “He said, ‘I’d like to record your show. Do you mind?’ I said, ‘No, not at all.’ There was a large reel-to-reel tape recorder in the box. “The stage was only about a foot off the ground. He knelt at the edge of the stage, with a microphone, at my feet. All during the show, he kept twisting knobs.” The resulting tape was stolen from a vehicle a short time later. Hendrix died in 1970. And it seemed Mitchell’s show would linger only in the memory of those who came out to Le Hibou. More than 30 years later, drummer Richard Patterson, who had played in Ottawa band The Esquires, asked fellow musician Ian McLeish to digitize more than 300 tapes he had amassed over the years. “Some were tapes sent to him by artists trying to get on the air, some were tapes of the groups and the artists he’d been involved with. And some were just tapes that he found hanging around in the studios,” McLeish said in an interview. After Patterson’s death in 2011, his estate asked McLeish to go through the old recordings again. “And I found a bunch of tapes Richard hadn’t given me the first time. And one of them was Joni Mitchell at Le Hibou, March 1968, taped by Jimi.” McLeish digitized the tape, and the original, along with all the others from Patterson, were given to Library and Archives Canada. “But I kept the digitized versions of everything,” said McLeish, who releases vintage Canadian recordings through Mousehole Music. “And I was hoping that this Joni thing might be of interest to somebody someday. But I didn’t really think, being an old tape, that it was that important.” McLeish heard last year that Mitchell had begun issuing some early performances. “And I said, well, this would be right up her alley.” He got in touch with the performer’s management and sent along the digital file. “They passed it on to Joni and, from what I understand, she freaked out. She had thought this stuff was lost forever, and so was really, really pleased to hear this set.” McLeish said he looked into retrieving the tape from Library and Archives because Mitchell expressed interest in having the original, but COVID-19 restrictions complicated matters. Richard Green, now retired from the archives, was manager of the music section when Patterson’s tapes were offered to the institution. He recalls accepting them even though there was a freeze on such acquisitions at the time. “I essentially took it upon myself to bring the material in when I wasn’t supposed to, and to hide it away in the backlog.” A full inventory was not done at the time, so Green didn’t know the Mitchell tape was among the recordings. The mystery is how it got into Patterson’s collection in the first place, McLeish said. “I don’t really know, because Richard’s gone now, how he got a hold of it. But I assume because he was always picking up tapes and adding them to the collection, either somebody gave it to him because they knew he was archiving stuff. Or he saw it somewhere and said, ‘Hey, can I take this?’” This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021. Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press

Still hope for an average crop in some parts of Sask.

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 06:00
For many farmers across Saskatchewan, it has been a tough year with many challenges ahead. Whether it’s from the drought or an infestation, there’s no shortage of hardship. However, there is still hope for a decent crop for some. Todd Lewis farms southeast of Regina. He’s also the president of the Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan. There’s a chance he could get an alright yield this year. “We’re in an area that we’ve caught some showers,” Lewis said. We’re in the heavy clay south of Regina. Once we do get some showers, the ground will hold the moisture a little bit better than other areas. “We have a possibility of having an average crop, especially if we get another rain here.” He’s still seen much better years, but he’s grateful for what he has. “Ninety per cent of the province, I’m sure, would trade with what we have in our area right now,” he said. However, there’s still no guarantee he’ll be able to make a good profit this year. “There’s still concern. The crop’s far from being in the bin yet … We’re quickly coming to the end of any kind of additional filling to these crops,” Lewis said. Some rain in the next week or so would definitely help to maintain his crops, but the forecast shows dry, sunny days ahead. “The jury’s out here yet on if we’re going to have an average crop … (but) we do have something at least that we’re going to put through the combine,” he said. “Unfortunately, that’s a different story than a lot of the province.”

Head to the Fringe Festival: Five things to do in Saskatoon this weekend

Saskatoon StarPhoenix - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 06:00
The Fringe Festival and the Rotary Ribfest are back in Saskatoon after the events were cancelled last year. Check out the details on those events and others happening in Saskatoon this weekend ... Read More

Jamie Nye: Are player-managers the new winning combination?

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 04:34
Aaron Rodgers clearly wants to bring a little more of the NBA mentality to football. The Green Bay Packers quarterback believes he should and could have been a valuable resource when it comes to player retention and recruitment. Players come to play with him after all, he said in his extremely open and honest interview on Wednesday. You have to believe he watched Tom Brady build a championship team in Tampa and thought, “If only my team thought I could have some pull and sway with fellow players.” Of course, this would be new to football. But it’s been happening in basketball, especially with LeBron James since his move to South Beach, Fla., then his move back to Cleveland, then his move to Los Angeles. You have to give him credit, he’s built championships in every market he’s moved to. Tom Brady did the same in Tampa. And you have to believe we’ll have to get used to the marquee players in all sports starting to get more of a say of who joins them. Maybe the Oilers should let Connor McDavid do a little more of the grunt work ahead of free agency next year.

Statistics Canada says economy appears to have grown in second quarter

CTV Saskatoon - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 02:59
Statistics Canada says the economy appears to have grown in the second quarter of the year despite two months of setbacks.
Categories: Saskatoon News

Japan expands virus emergency after record spikes amid Games

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 02:32
TOKYO (AP) — Japan expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo on Friday following record spikes in infections as the capital hosts the Olympics. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared an emergency in Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, near Tokyo, as well as in the western city of Osaka, effective Monday until Aug. 31. Emergency measures already in place in Tokyo will be extended until the end of August, after the Olympics and well into the Paralympics which start Aug. 24. Tokyo has reported a record increase in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday, before logging another 3,300 on Friday. The cases have doubled since last week, although officials say the surge is unrelated to the Olympics. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. TOKYO (AP) — Japan is set to expand the coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo to neighboring areas and the western city of Osaka on Friday in the wake of a record surge in infections while the capital hosts the Olympics. A government panel approved the plan putting Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, as well as Osaka, under the state of emergency from Monday until Aug. 31. The measures already in place in Tokyo and the southern island of Okinawa will be extended until the end of August. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is scheduled to officially announce the measures later Friday. Five other areas, including Hokkaido, Kyoto, Hyogo and Fukuoka, will be placed under less-stringent emergency restrictions. Tokyo has reported a record rise in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday. The cases have doubled since last week, and officials have warned they may hit 4,500 a day within two weeks. Officials said 2,995 were hospitalized, about half the current capacity of 6,000 beds, with some hospitals already full. More than 10,000 others were isolating at home or designated hotels, with nearly 5,600 waiting at home while health centers decide where they will be treated. Tokyo is also setting up a facility for those requiring oxygen while waiting for hospital beds. At Friday's meeting of government experts, Health Minister Norihisa Tamura said the spike in Tokyo despite being under the state of emergency for two weeks is an “alarming development that is different from anything we have seen before.” Nationwide, Japan reported 10,687 confirmed cases Thursday, exceeding 10,000 for the first time. It has recorded 15,166 fatalities from COVID-19, including 2,288 in Tokyo, since the pandemic began. Japan has kept its cases and deaths lower than many other countries, but its seven-day rolling average is growing and now stands at 28 per 100,000 people nationwide and 88 per 100,000 in Tokyo, according to the Health Ministry. This compares to 18.5 in the United States, 48 in Britain and 2.8 in India, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The emergency measures focus on an alcohol ban at eateries and karaoke bars and their shortened hours, but they have become less effective because people are only requested to stay and work from home. Many were defying the measures as they have become tired of restrictive life and less cooperative even at a time when the more infectious delta strain is spreading. “We need to come up with measures that are effective,” Tokyo Gov Yuriko Koike told a regular news conference Friday, without elaborating. Noting that adults in their 30s or younger dominate recent cases, Koike reminded them of following basic anti-virus measures including mask-wearing and avoiding having parties, urging them to “share the sense of crisis.” As of Thursday, 27% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated. The percentage of the elderly who are fully vaccinated is 71.5%. Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press

Japan expands virus emergency after record spikes amid Games

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 02:32
TOKYO (AP) — Japan expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo on Friday following record spikes in infections as the capital hosts the Olympics. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared an emergency in Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, near Tokyo, as well as in the western city of Osaka, effective Monday until Aug. 31. Emergency measures already in place in Tokyo will be extended until the end of August, after the Olympics and well into the Paralympics which start Aug. 24. Tokyo has reported a record increase in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday, before logging another 3,300 on Friday. The cases have doubled since last week, although officials say the surge is unrelated to the Olympics. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. TOKYO (AP) — Japan is set to expand the coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo to neighboring areas and the western city of Osaka on Friday in the wake of a record surge in infections while the capital hosts the Olympics. A government panel approved the plan putting Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, as well as Osaka, under the state of emergency from Monday until Aug. 31. The measures already in place in Tokyo and the southern island of Okinawa will be extended until the end of August. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is scheduled to officially announce the measures later Friday. Five other areas, including Hokkaido, Kyoto, Hyogo and Fukuoka, will be placed under less-stringent emergency restrictions. Tokyo has reported a record rise in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday. The cases have doubled since last week, and officials have warned they may hit 4,500 a day within two weeks. Officials said 2,995 were hospitalized, about half the current capacity of 6,000 beds, with some hospitals already full. More than 10,000 others were isolating at home or designated hotels, with nearly 5,600 waiting at home while health centers decide where they will be treated. Tokyo is also setting up a facility for those requiring oxygen while waiting for hospital beds. At Friday's meeting of government experts, Health Minister Norihisa Tamura said the spike in Tokyo despite being under the state of emergency for two weeks is an “alarming development that is different from anything we have seen before.” Nationwide, Japan reported 10,687 confirmed cases Thursday, exceeding 10,000 for the first time. It has recorded 15,166 fatalities from COVID-19, including 2,288 in Tokyo, since the pandemic began. Japan has kept its cases and deaths lower than many other countries, but its seven-day rolling average is growing and now stands at 28 per 100,000 people nationwide and 88 per 100,000 in Tokyo, according to the Health Ministry. This compares to 18.5 in the United States, 48 in Britain and 2.8 in India, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The emergency measures focus on an alcohol ban at eateries and karaoke bars and their shortened hours, but they have become less effective because people are only requested to stay and work from home. Many were defying the measures as they have become tired of restrictive life and less cooperative even at a time when the more infectious delta strain is spreading. “We need to come up with measures that are effective,” Tokyo Gov Yuriko Koike told a regular news conference Friday, without elaborating. Noting that adults in their 30s or younger dominate recent cases, Koike reminded them of following basic anti-virus measures including mask-wearing and avoiding having parties, urging them to “share the sense of crisis.” As of Thursday, 27% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated. The percentage of the elderly who are fully vaccinated is 71.5%. Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press

Statistics Canada to give early glimpse of how economy fared in second quarter

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 02:30
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada will say today how the economy fared in May and give its early estimate on the second quarter of the year. Last month, the agency said its preliminary estimate was that real gross domestic product fell by 0.3 per cent in May, mirroring a similar decline in April. The overall decline in April, as well as the early estimate for May, put overall economic activity about one per cent below pre-pandemic levels seen in February 2020. But June brought promises of better numbers as vaccination rates rose and restrictions rolled back, although not fully in much of the country. In a note setting up the release, BMO chief economist Douglas Porter says there will likely be a decline in real GDP for May, but a rebound in June that should mark the start of a run of gains as the economy steadily reopens. The Bank of Canada this month forecasted that the economy would grow at an annualized rate of two per cent in the second quarter, down from its earlier estimate of 3.5 per cent. This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021. The Canadian Press

Canadian women mine more Olympic gold and B.C.’s killer heat: In The News for July 30

News Talk 650 CKOM - Fri, 07/30/2021 - 02:30
In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what's on the radar of our editors for the morning of July 30 ... What we are watching on the world stage ...  TOKYO—The Canadian women's eight rowing crew has captured gold at the Tokyo Olympics.  They crossed the line first in Friday's final with a time of five minutes 59.13 seconds at Sea Forest Waterway.  It's Canada's first gold in the event since the 1992 Barcelona Games, the first women's gold at the Olympics since 1996, and the program's first podium-topping performance since 2008. New Zealand grabbed silver, while China took bronze.  "We had some really tight races," said Lisa Roman of Langley, B.C. "We built up every race. We decided today was going to be the best race. We knew if we laid down our best race we could probably win the gold medal.  Canada will leave the Tokyo Olympics with two rowing medals, after Victoria's Caileigh Filmer and Hillary Janssens of Surrey, B.C., secured bronze in Thursday's women's pair.  The double-podium performance comes after Canada won just one medal — in the lightweight women's double sculls — at the Rio Games five years ago.  “It’s huge," Roman added. "We’ve worked so hard. I’m so grateful I got to be a part of this ... It’s wonderful." --- What we are watching in Canada ... VANCOUVER — Two groups focused on environmental issues are calling on the British Columbia government to come up with a plan to track "heat dome injuries" following record-setting temperatures that are also linked with 570 deaths in the province over a one-week period. Representatives of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and the West Coast Environmental Law Association said thousands of people across the province sought medical help for conditions like heat stroke, dehydration and even brain injury but there's no way to track the extent of the problem. Doctors submit a billing code based on a patient's condition so they can be paid by the province, but no code exists for illness related to heat waves. Dr. Melissa Lem, incoming president of the physicians' group, said she was using a code for headache for some of her patients suffering from the effects of heat in late June, but it didn't include symptoms linked to temperatures hitting 31.7 C in Vancouver and into the high 40s elsewhere in B.C. She said while the B.C. Coroners Service tracked deaths related to the heat, no one was tracking severe illness associated with the "heat dome" — where high pressure parks over an area and warm air sinks — that covered the province. "I saw more heat-related illness than I had ever seen in my career. For example, healthy 20-year-olds who were at the beach all day and unable to cool off when they returned home to their apartments," said Lem, a family doctor in Vancouver. Doctors should be directed to use a specific billing and diagnostic code for heat illnesses so accurate data are collected to support patients, Lem said, adding Doctors of BC, the medical association for the province, instructed physicians to use a code for any services related to COVID-19, for example. The B.C. Health Ministry said the province "is developing a plan to prepare and adapt to climate change" that builds on steps it has already taken to protect public safety. Lem estimates nearly 10 people suffered some kind of heat-related sickness for every person who died in B.C., amounting to between 5,000 and 6,000 visits to doctors' offices and emergency rooms after 911 callers overwhelmed paramedics. --- Also this ... OTTAWA —Transactional clues — from hotel bills paid in cash to purchases of escort-service ads — are helping Canada's financial intelligence agency detect human trafficking in the sex trade.  The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada is now learning from its sleuthing efforts in recent years to make pinpointing traffickers a little easier. Fintrac identifies cash linked to money laundering by sifting through millions of pieces of information each year from banks, insurance companies, securities dealers, money service businesses, real estate brokers, casinos and others. It says data received from these organizations has enabled it to disclose 979 packets of intelligence to police and other law-enforcement agencies about suspected cases of sex trafficking, almost all involving exploitation of young women, in the last five years. The disclosures, flowing from an initiative dubbed Project Protect, are helping Fintrac zero in even more closely on signs of money dealings linked to the crime. The project, a public-private partnership initiative launched in 2016, is led by the Bank of Montreal and supported by Fintrac and Canadian law enforcement. Fintrac is issuing a new operational alert to banks and other reporting organizations, advising them to be on the lookout for certain kinds of transactions now known to be associated with trafficking women and girls. "The goal is to save lives, and every single one matters," said Fintrac director Sarah Paquet. "So we really want this to succeed and continue to improve on strengthening the regime."  --- What we are watching in the U.S. ... WASHINGTON — The Biden administration has announced sweeping new pandemic rules for federal workers and some contractors.  It is requiring that any federal civilian worker who does not verify being fully vaccinated will be subject to universal masking, weekly testing, physical distancing from other employees and restrictions on official travel.  The guidelines are aimed at boosting vaccination rates among the millions of Americans who draw federal paychecks and to set an example for private employers around the country.   Biden said, “This is an American tragedy. People are dying who don’t have to die.” The administration encouraged businesses to follow its lead on incentivizing vaccinations by imposing burdens on the unvaccinated. Rather than mandating that federal workers receive vaccines, the plan will make life more difficult for those who are unvaccinated to encourage them to comply. Biden also directed the Defense Department to look into adding the COVID-19 shot to its list of required vaccinations for members of the military. And he has directed his team to take steps to apply similar requirements to all federal contractors. Biden also urged state and local governments to use funds provided by the coronavirus relief package to incentivize vaccinations by offering $100 to individuals who get the shots. And he announced that small- and medium-sized businesses will receive reimbursements if they offer employees time off to get family members vaccinated. --- What we are watching in the rest of the world ... TOKYO — Japan is set to expand the coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo to neighboring areas and the western city of Osaka in the wake of a record-breaking surge in infections while the capital hosts the Olympics.  A government panel approved the plan putting Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, as well as Osaka, under the state of emergency from today until Aug. 31.  The measures already in place in Tokyo and the southern island of Okinawa will be extended until the end of August. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is scheduled to officially announce the measures later today.  Tokyo has reported a record rise in cases for three days in a row, including 3,865 on Thursday. The cases have doubled since last week.  --- Also this ...  JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister has announced that the country will offer a coronavirus booster to people over 60 who have already been vaccinated.  Thursday's announcement by Naftali Bennett makes Israel the first country to offer a third dose of the Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine to its citizens on a wide scale. The decision came at a time of rising infections and concerns that the vaccine’s efficacy dwindles over time.  Israel's president, Isaac Herzog, is to be the first to get the booster on Friday. It will be offered to the general public beginning Sunday. “Reality proves the vaccines are safe," Bennett said in a nationally televised address. "Reality also proves the vaccines protect against severe morbidity and death. And like the flu vaccine that needs to be renewed from time to time, it is the same in this case.” Anyone over 60 who was vaccinated more than five months ago will be eligible. Neither the U.S. nor the EU have approved coronavirus booster shots. It’s not yet proven if a third dose helps and, if so, who needs one and when. But Bennett said that a team of expert advisers had agreed overwhelmingly, by a 56-1 margin, that it made sense to launch the booster campaign. He said the recommendation was made after “considerable research and analysis” and that its information would be shared around the world.  --- On this day in 1962 ... Prime minister John Diefenbaker officially opened the Trans-Canada Highway to traffic at ceremonies at Rogers Pass, B.C. The public had begun demanding a national road in 1910, but the work wasn't started until 1950. The opening of the 7,821-kilometre road, the longest national highway in the world, meant Canadians could drive from St. John's, N.L., to Victoria (with the services of ferries at either end). The toughest challenges to the builders of the road included the avalanche-prone Rogers Pass and the tunnel under the St. Lawrence River near Montreal. --- In entertainment ... OTTAWA — An Ottawa drummer with a passion for collecting reel-to-reel tapes deserves applause for the coming release of a Joni Mitchell performance recorded over half a century ago by none other than legendary guitarist Jimi Hendrix. The impromptu 1968 recording session of blossoming singer-songwriter Mitchell at Ottawa's Le Hibou Coffee House has long been the stuff of pop music lore, documented in Hendrix's diary. But the tape's fate was a mystery for decades. Mitchell announced this week that selections from the Ottawa gig would be included on a volume of archival recordings from 1968-71 to be released in October. A 24-year-old Mitchell was performing at Le Hibou on March 19 1968, when Hendrix, playing the nearby Capitol Theatre, phoned the Alberta-born songstress, whom he would dub "fantastic girl with heaven words" in his diary. Hendrix asked Mitchell if he could record her on his reel-to-reel tape machine -- and she yes. Sadly, the resulting tape was stolen from a vehicle a short time later, but more than 30 years later it surfaced in the possession of drummer Richard Patterson. And before he died in 2011 Patterson included the Mitchell tape in a stash of about 300 others that he gave to fellow musician Ian McLeish to digitize. --- Also this ...  MONTREAL — The acclaimed TV series "Mohawk Girls" has been picked up by NBC's streaming service Peacock. The series, which originally aired on APTN from 2014 to 2017 and  follows four women in their 20s as they try to find a balance between work, love, sex, culture and community. The half-hour dramatic comedy was created by Tracey Deer and Cynthia Knight, based on Deer's 2005 documentary of the same name.  Rezolution Pictures says all five seasons of "Mohawk Girls" started streaming in the United States earlier this month. Canadians can stream the show on CBC Gem. --- ICYMI ... LONDON — A slice of one of Prince Charles and Diana's wedding cakes is up for auction decades after the nuptials.  The slice of iced cake came from one of the 23 official wedding cakes marking the marriage of the heir to the British throne and his shy bride on July 29, 1981, which was 40 years ago on Thursday.  It features a marzipan base and a sugar onlay coat-of-arms, coloured in gold, red, blue, and silver, on top.  The piece of cake was given to Moyra Smith, a member of the Queen Mother’s household at Clarence House, who kept it in a floral cake tin. Smith’s family sold the cake to a collector in 2008, but it is up for auction again Aug. 11.  It's expected to fetch between 300 pounds ($520) and 500 pounds ($868), together with an order of service, ceremonial details and a royal wedding breakfast program. Chris Albury, auctioneer and senior valuer at Dominic Winter Auctioneers, says the cake appears to be in exactly the same good condition as when it was originally sold — but adds ''we advise against eating it.” --- This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021 The Canadian Press

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